Press Clippings

pdf 1985 – July 22- Sacramento Bee – Welfare-rights organizations against plan

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1985 – July 22- Sacramento Bee – Welfare-rights organizations against plan.pdf

” The Sacramento Bee Monday, July 22, 1985 Aa \u00b7welfare-rights organizations against plan By Thorne Gray Bee C.phol Bureau In a page-by-page analysts called a \”recipient Impact statement,\” the Coalition of California Welfare Rights Organizations condemns a bipartisan workfare plan In\u00adtroduced Thursday in the Assembly. \”It ls clear that workfare does not benefit recipients,\” the coalition said. \”It creates a free work force for state and local government and non-profit organizations, such as hospitals, nursing homes, community action agencies and other organizations who will use women with chil\u00ad dren as a cheap labor force without any benefits to the women.\” The organization, which calls itself an Independent, statewide, gras&,roots organization, has fought workfare for years, counting Assemblyman Art Agnos, D-San Francisco, among its more powerful allles. Now, the coalition said, Agnos has been recruited by Secretary of Health and Welfare David Swoap to help draft a workfare program that mistakenly \”assumes that our country has unlimited jobs.\” Agnos, a liberal, and conservative Swoap dratted the proposal together. Workfare proponents say many of the coalition’s points may be inaccurate and have expressed willing\u00ad nes to fine tune the legislation, although there may be enough votes In both the Aaembly and the Senate to ap\u00ad prove the plan’s major features. The points the coalition wants considered include: Required public hearinp on the Individual county workfare plans to be drawn up over the next three years. \u00b7 Performance standards for the program, and a way to end workfare if those standards are not met. More protection for refugees, who \ufffdeed education rather than an endless search for work they cannot get. Assurance that all the counties will offer a true range of options for welfare recipients, not just \”job search-workfare.\” Actual expenses for child care, transportation, books and other necessities, not just inadequate allowances. A way to be sure that child-care services for welfare families are safe. The workfare program assumes that welfare recipi\u00ad ents have never worked a day In their lives, the coalition said. 1t appears that the proponents of this legislation do not consider raising children a ‘job’; rather It ls some\u00ad thing that \u00b7women dQ naturally, \” the coalition said. What AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent Children) recipients want are jobs, jobs, jobs. we want to go to work, get a paycheck and be a\ufffde to say that we are not on welfare. \”This blll forces us to work and still be on welfare.\” ”

pdf 1985 – July 25 – LA Times – Revised Workfare Plan Is His Own, Governor Claim

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1985 – July 25 – LA Times – Revised Workfare Plan Is His Own, Governor Claim.pdf

” Thursday, July 2S, 1985\/Part I \ufffd\ufffd Revised Workfare Plan Is His Own, Governor Claims By RICHARD C. PADDOCK, ftma Staff Wrillr SACRAMENTO-Gov. George Deukmejian took credit W ednes\u00ad day for a bipartisan workfare pro\u00ad posal, contending that it is his own plan with a few extras added by Democratic legislators. \”I think the only difference is that there is perhaps a greater array of services that will be provided with more options\/; Deukmejian told reporters after addressing a meeting of the Cali\u00ad fornia Welfare Fraud investigators Assn. in West Sacramento. Assemblyman Art Agnos ( D\u00ad San Francisco), a leader in forging the compromise, promptly re\u00ad sponded that the new plan is far broader than the one originally proposed by Deukmejian. Agnos suggested the governor’s \”political pronouncements\” could jeopardize chances for legislative approv\ufffd of the compromise. Upcomlq Campalp Note4 \”I think the governor is probably reflecting the upcoming campaign season,\” Agnos said. \”Until the fish is hooked and put into the basket, we shouldn’t exaggerate its size or the role we played in landing it.\” Agnos, Health .and Welfare Sec\u00ad retary David Swoap and legislators from both parties announced agreement last week on a plan called GAIN that would require able-bodied welfare recipients to work, receive vocational training or go to school in exchange for their grants. The delicately crafted compro\u00ad mise provides elements sought by both conservatives and liberals. Welfare recipients, primarily women with children over the age of 6, would -be required to partici\u00ad pate in the program but would be able to choose from a variety of work and traininl options. Completiq Colle1e Some would be allowed to com\u00ad plete their college education while on welfare. As many as one third of the eligible recipients could be required to work for their checks in an element of the program com\u00ad monly known as workfare. Advocates of the program say it would be the biggest overhaul of the welfare system in 15 years. Deukmejian, who has been push\u00ad ing legislation to enact his own workfare proposal called STEP-UP, a simpler program that would include job search, vocation\u00ad al training and workfare. Legisla\u00ad tors, anticipating a bipartilan com- promise plan, have delayed action on the Deukmejian proposal. In his addreaa to welfare fta\”d investigators, the Republican ‘8 \u00ad ernor briefly di1cu1aed hi1 STEP-UP plan. \”I’m encouraged that we have a bipartisan support for this pro- gram,\” Deukmejian said. . . Afterwards, ‘be told \ufffdl’I in a hotel parking lot that he WU referring to the GAIN propim unveiled last week. .,Fundamentally, it’s -\u00b7 the STEP-UP plan,\” he said. \”They (legislators) have suggested some changes, which we have accepted, but essentially it is the STEP-UP program which we had proposed.\ufffd’ The governor’, description aur\u00ad prised Agnos who said, \”The fact.of the matter is that the b\ufffd welfare reform propoaai ii a brind new product\” The compromise agreed to , J:>y legislators and Swoap-who\ufffd- ‘The fact of the matter is that the bipartisan welfare reform proposal is a brand new product.’ -‘ …. ….,….Ari\ufffd sented Deukmejian in the negotia\u00ad tions-drew on a variety of earlier proposals including STEP-UP, Ag\u00ad nos said. But, he said, it – also contains a number of new features such as: Giving welfare recipients some choice in selecting work and train\u00ad ing programs through a contract system. — Providing outside bindJng arbi\u00ad tration to settle dispute,\u00b7 between recipients and coW?,ty welfare de- partments. Tailoring job 1earch require\u00ad ments to recipien\u00b5.’ job histories. Allowing recipients to com\u00ad plete college if they have finiihed the first half of their education. Reducing punishment for vio\u00ad lators of program rules. The measure is expected to easily win approval in the Assembly, but its fate in the Senate is less clear. Agnos said the governor’s state\u00ad ments could make it tougher to win support among Democrats, espe\u00ad cially those reluctant to give De&ik\u00ad mejian an issue to boOlt his bJd to: reelection in 1988. ”

pdf 1985 – November 10 – San Francisco Examiner-Chronicle – Workfare plans to put welfare out of a job –

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pdf 1985 – September 23- Fremont Argus – Revolutionary 'workfare' slated for state i 1990

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1985 – September 23- Fremont Argus – Revolutionary 'workfare' slated for state i 1990.pdf

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pdf 1985 -September 24 – San Ramon Valley Herald – Praise due for 'workfare'

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1985 -September 24 – San Ramon Valley Herald – Praise due for 'workfare'.pdf

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pdf 1985- August 21-San Diego Evening Tribune – 'Workfare' plan passes key test in Legislature

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1985- August 21-San Diego Evening Tribune – "Workfare' plan passes key test in Legislature.pdf

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pdf 1985- July 18 – Sacramento Bee – Workfare touted as money-saver

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1985- July 18 – Sacramento Bee – Workfare touted as money-saver.pdf

” _____ …….. ___;. ______________________ _ Capitol Report Workfare. toute_d as money-saver Plan would give jobs to thousands on welfare, backers say By Thorne Gray Bee Capitol 81Dreaa Thousands of able-bodied welfare recipients would be put to \\1d’ork for public agencies and non\u00ad profit organizations under a sweeping statewide \u00b7 welfare reform proposal that state officials said Wednesday aaso would save state anosal, Assembly members Gloria compromise, . explained that welfare recipients Molina, D-Los Angeles; Lucy Killea, D-san Die\u00ad would be working for the equivalent of $5.07 an go;Wally Berger, R-Yuba City; and Sens. John hour, well above the mlnlmlllm wage and even Garamendi, D-Walnut Grove, and Bill Greerie, D\u00ad more than the average starting wage in the state. Los Angeles, all of whom are expected to be co- Agnos said the recipients will cfo \”additional authors of th,e proposal. jobs that could be done if people were available ,Now that Agnos and Swoap have put the propos- but that do not displace existing jobs.\” al together, \”I’ll take full credit for it,\” Speaker That means they would work in printing plants, Brown joked. His endorsement appeared to signal the state-\u00b7clertcal force and\u00b7 water quality labora- few problems tor the plan In the Assembly. tortes, or as police auxmartes, nm\”Se or library Agnos, Swoap, Konnyu, Killea, Berger and aides, playground monitors or crossing guards, Molina have worked for months with the blessing among other tasks mentioned. of Brown and Senate President Pro Tern David As many as 170,000 of the state’s 600,000 adult Roberti, D-Los Angeles, to draft the compromise welfare recipients would take part in the program plan. Roberti remains uncommitted to the propos\u00ad the first year, with 60,000 or more getting jobs in al, however. the private- sector, the administration predicted. The plan is based! on workfare programs in On their way to getting jobso they would be of- three other states plus an experimental program fered training programs, work experience oppor- in San Diego. tunitles and schooling to help them compete In The schem1e would be unique In the nation in at the. workplace. least two res1,ects, Agnos and Swoap said. Those If the jobs they get pay less tban tl1ey were get- are-the .higher rate of pay and the fact that wel\u00ad ting on welfare, single parents would be subsl- fare recipients would sign a performance con\u00ad dized while their child care and Medl-C&l benefits \u00b7 tract with their counties. continued. Two-parent fammes could only contin- The contract would set forth their. rights, the ue to be subsidized for about three months be\u00b7 services the counties would provide them and cause of federal law. their responsibillties and goals. Agnos was joined by Secretary of Health and Bates and other critics, though, predicted little Welfare David Swoap and Director of Social Ser- ln1pact on the welfare rolls unless more full-time vices Linda McMahon ln a two-hour press confer- jobs are created ln the economy. J———————————— ”

pdf 1985- July 21 – Contra Costa Times – Compromise on welfare reform shows promise

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1985- July 21 – Contra Costa Times – Compromise on welfare reform shows promise.pdf

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pdf 1985- June 19 – San Diego Evening Tribune – Welfare officials objects to changes in 'workare' bill

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1985- June 19 – San Diego Evening Tribune – Welfare officials objects to changes in 'workare' bill.pdf

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pdf 1985- March 25 -1985-CCWRO Press Clipping- San Jose Mercury – Soaring welfare costs foreseen

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pdf 1985- November 10- San Francisco Examiner – Workfare proposes to put welfare out of a job

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pdf 1985- September 30 – LA Times – San Diego Trial Paved Way for New Workfare Law

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1985- September 30 – LA Times – San Diego Trial Paved Way for New Workfare Law.pdf

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pdf 1985-Dec. 12 – CCWRO Press Clipping – The Daily Recorder – Lobbyist helps protect rights of welfare recipients.pdf

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pdf 1985-July 18 – CCWRO Press Clipping – Los Angeles Times – Workfare Proposal Would Cost Millions Before Paying Off.pdf

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CCWRO Press Clipping – 7-18-85 – Los Angeles Times – Workfare Proposal Would Cost Millions Before Paying Off.pdf

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pdf 1986 – Aprl 23- Oakdale Leader – Coalition doubts workfare program

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pdf 1986 – August 4 – Modesto Bee – Volunteers help welfare. people fight for rights.pdf

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1986 – August 4 – Modesto Bee – Volunteers help welfare. people fight for rights.pdf

” \u00b7 Volunteers help welfare. people fight for rights_ Group goes to bat ag\ufffdinst system . . . ,,. – . By KARYN HOUSTON Bee staff writer When Elisa James comes call\u00ad ing, she’s often \u00b7loaded down with hefty bookS and binders. . . The manuals — filled with the policies,\u00b7 procedures and regula\u00ad tions for the statewide Depart\u00ad ment of Social Services – are her ammunition. With them, she says, she’s armed to fight the sys\u00ad tem. James is founder and director of the Stanislaus Countv Welfare Rights Organization, lonned a year ago. The organization is just one chapter of the larger, state- . wide Coalition of California Wel\u00ad fare Rights Organizations, head\u00ad quartered in Sacramento. The theory behind welfare rights is capsulized by James with this succinct statement: \”When you’re born into this world you need to eat, you need to be sheltered and you need to be clothed. Those three items are the basics …. You shouldn’t have to go hungry.\” The welfare rights group deals mostly with the welfare depart\u00ad ment, the monolithic county agency that operated on nearly a $90 million budget last year and serves more than 10,000 families each month. James and Ora \u00b7 Scruggs, ad\u00ad ministrator of the organization, both work as full-time volun\u00ad teers, mostly out of the garage of James’ Modesto home. They say they are not paid and get what little they can from donations by the welfare recipients they’ve helped. What they thriVe on is their work. \”Our purpose is to help people get the aid that they’re entitled to under the law and get it for them . when they need it,\” James said. \”To educate and empower them to be abl\ufffd to negotiate on their own behalf. ‘Our purpose IJ lo \u00b7. hel\u00b7p people get-the\u00b7\u00b7 . aid that they’re entitled to under .the law and get it for them when they \u00b7 need It’ -Elisa James That’s payment right\u00b7 there.\” In one case, James said, she was able to help\u00b7 a family that had been sanctioned – meaning the family suffered reduced or discontinued benefits – because it failed to keep an appointment at the welfare department. James said she proved to a state hearing officer that the fam\u00ad ily had indeed kept the appoint\u00ad ment. She said she was able to get the benefits reinstated. Every time the coalition gets a case of a recipient not able to work out a problem, James said, she first tries communicating with a caseworker or supervisor. If possible, the problem is solved early on. But sometimes, James said, she has to take the client through a fair hearing p\ufffd cess, in which a state attorney, the clierit, the recipients \u00b7 repre\u00ad sentatiYe and a . representative from. the- county welfare office tty to work the _matter out Welfare recipients can.. d\ufffdsig\u00ad nate anyone, _ including the-coali\u00ad tion. .to be their representative. Other groups, including Callfor\u00ad nla Rural Legal Assistance, the Western Center of Law and Pov\u00ad erty and some private attorneys, may serve as representatives for \u00b7 welfare recipients during _the fair hearing process. Modesto Bee Au.gu.st. 4, 1986 James said she has filed\u00b7 for about 60 fair hearings in the past year and won almost every one. She also noted that a fair hearing can cost the county about $2,000. But Marsena Buck, director of the\u00b7 county Department of Social Services, said fair hearings, on a statewide average, cost only about $500. Buck noted that be\u00ad tween Jan. I and June 30 she received 42 requests for fair hearings in which the welfare rights organization was the rep\u00ad resentative. Of the 42 requests, Buck said, one was granted, two were de … nied and in four the decision is still pending. The- rest were ei\u00ad ther postponed, withdrawn or no\u00ad shows, she said. James said Buck’s figures were inac\ufffdrate, and she stood behind h\ufffdr statement that she had won VI\ufffdually every fair hearing in which she had participated. Both James and Scruggs said they are not, as a general rule made to feel welcome at the wel: fa\ufffd department by employees. The reason why they don’t want us there is that we are un\u00adcovering their mistakes. We pick \/UP where \u00b7 they failed to contin\u00adfue.\” Scruggs said. Buck said she does not mind the presence of the welfare rights group, adding that federal law is very clear about the client’s right to representation by any individ\u00adual or organization. The fair hearing process. aJso See Page B-2, WELFARE WELFARE: Volunteer group helps people.fight for rights CONTINUED. from B-1 guaranteed bf.’ federal law, is the welfare recipient’s r.igbt of due process, a system Buck said she strongly supports. . . . . James said most oroblems at the welfare department are. in the intake unit where recipients check in. \”lbere’s not enough of them (case workers),\” James said. \”Their caseload is too big and their training is not long enough for . them to know all the rules and regulations.\” But James complimented workers and supelVisors in the continuing unit, where welfare recipients are helped on an ongo\u00ad ing basis. \”We’ve always been able to work things out with no problem.\” Working things out also fig\u00ad ures into future plans for the co\u00ad alition. James is currently trying to fig\u00ad ure out a way for the organiza\u00ad tion to help people who have out\u00ad standing utility bills work with local companies and arrange time payments. Another future challenge that the coalition is preparing for is \”workfare,\” a state-mandated program scheduled to begin in Stanislaus County Sept. 1. In the program, all able-bodied recipi\u00ad ents of Aid to Earni!it1 JUith De\u00ad pendent ChiJdren will have to go t

pdf 1986 – December 12 – The Daily Recorder – Lobbyist helps protect rits of welfare recipients

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1986 – December 12 – The Daily Recorder – Lobbyist helps protect rits of welfare recipients.pdf

” \ufffd The Daily Recorder Se111ing the Capital and Califo_r’}ia since 1911 __ Friday, December 12, 1986 Lobbyist helps _ _.,: I . protect rights of\u00b7\u00b7 \u00b7 welfare recipients By SUnlta SohrabJI o\ufffd \ufffdrder Staff w\ufffd\ufffd When Kevin Aslanian fmt became involved in welfare issues, he was working at a string of menial jobs, hacf only recently learned to spia..,at English, was on welfare himself, and was angry with then-Gov. Ronald Reagan for pushing welfare reform. \”I thought it quite Wljust that Reagan did not pay taxes but received subsidies, and he was complaining about poor people receiving money to house and feed their children. That prompted me into getting involved with welfare rights.\” said Aslanian, 1he son of Communist parents, a former resident of the Soviet.Union and now the lobbyist for the Coalition\u00b7 of\u00b7 California Welfare Rights Organmaions. A Daily Recor\ufffd r, Pfoflle .. , That wa in 1971 and Aslanian, .aten 28 and a SaD: Jose resident, joined \ufffd- welfare l’CIICjpientsand founded tho Welfare \u00b7\u00b7 Recipienfs\u00b7Jague. \”We needed to protect ourselves from constandy being \ufffd ,by &be county welfare department, wjjo seaned to have the notion that you’re guilty until proven innocent,\” liq\” said. \”The thtay was ihat if we stood to&ethez. we might diminish the amount of abuse recipil\ufffd were subjected to.\ufffd AS\ufffd, who . aaught himself welfare law.ii. and neva \ufffd college, worked widt ihe ieague for eight y\ufffd, eventually fou.qding the welfare rights coalition to; lobby the Legislature on behalf of\ufffd\u00b7 recipients. Volume 75, Number 241 The coalition, comprised of local welfare groups statewide, only began receiving funding two years ago. Aslanian came Qll staff in July to work part-time directly assisting the needy, and pan-time u a lobbyist. The coalition also employs one full-time\u00b7 attorney and operates on a yearly budget of $100,000 from founda\u00ad tion grants and IX’ivate conttibu\ufffd. Aslanian, now 43, says \ufffd has lived most \u00b7or his life as a poor \ufffd \ufffd: he was six, Aslanian’s parents emi.gialal . with their three children from the United States to the Soviet Un\ufffd -\ufffd\u00ad meed extreme poverty \ufffdFive of us lived in two rooms with no shower, no bath, no hot water and no kitchen. We would eat potatoes three times a day, sometimes,\” he recalled. His parents had thought of Russia as a ‘ continued on page 2 Welfare from page 1 _________ _ \”heaven on earth\” said Aslanian. They had both been members of the Communist Party in the 1930s, and although they later dropped out, \”they still beliefflf in the propaganda that Russia was a pandise. At that\u00b7 time, Russia was the place ID be for prograsiffa.\” AsJanian’s parents decided to move to Rusu lt the start of the McCarthy \”Red\u00ad baiting\” era. \”They moved there not for lbauelves, but because they wanted to raise their children in a beur.r society,\” he said. . The Aslanians rounct .. out they were wrong about Russia, … CC>Qld \”\” \u00b7. not emigrare back under the rei\ufffd of Stalin. Tt.ey mnaiMI in Ruma for 14 ;-eiiii, until Kevin. was 20. Aslanian was\u00b7 work\u00ad ing the light man for a movie theatre at lhetime. . Aslanian cited a joke as an example of their situation: \”One Russian asks ano\u00ad ther Russian ‘what would you do if they opened up the borders?’ The man answers, ‘I would climb a tree to avoid being suunpcded.’\” Two Sections Everyone in the Soviet Union wanted to come to America, he said. BUI’ IN MOVING back to Ameri\u00ad ca, Aslanian was amued to find the same level of povaty existed Jae. \”I never thought that similar situa\u00ad tion would occur in this country, and yet I know m 10 people living in two rooms, two AFDC (welfare program) families who can’t afford tile rent on their own. \”It is so common here in the !a.\”Ml of milk and honey,\” he . said, adding that Russians would not believe that IOl’t of povaty exists htze. Aslanian was destitute upon his retmn, did not undmtand English and posseaed few stills. He enrolled in San Jose City College to learn English, and fpeaks eloquently now, although with a heavy accenL Growing up in Russia has made him vay non-mataialistic, said Aslanian. \”I have no need to keep up with the Joneses. I don’t en.\” Owning a car in Russia would be unthinkable for the common man, he said. The avm.ge wage is 120 rubles a month, and a car is about 5,000 rubles. \”You don’t think about having a car there. Now I have a TV; a house and a car; that’s heaven. What else do I need?\” Aslanian, who currently earns $20,000 a year, said his wife, Diane, is occasion\u00ad ally frustrated by his non-matenalism. \”She grew up here,\” he explained joking\u00ad ly. He has been married to Diane for 15 years. They have three children. Karena, the eldest, is 15, Seda is 13, and David is U. When be was begiiiriing his career as a lobbyist for California Rural Legal\”\ufffd’ Amstance in San Franciseo, As\ufffdia\ufffdr:\u00b7 . recalled bringing his cl\\lldren to Sacra- \ufffd : mento with him for \u00b7ari adventure. ”l’t:; would put them in an empty committee{;\ufffd room, and they would-sleep, and I would1r,i,1 take off to do my work.\” r\ufffdi (Next Page, More) lI[t\ufffd \u00b7 \”\”.1; Aslanian worked with Califmnia Rma1 Legal Aaislance, a federally-funded but state–administered legal aid program, from 1979 until this year, lobbying for welfare and food stamp recipien\ufffd. Between his work with the Welfare Recipients I.ague, the CRLA and the , coalition, Aslanian\” said he knows lhe welfare system better than those who administer the programs. You have to, Aslanian said he Is frustrated because people don’t really understand poveny and have many misconceptions about the poor. odaerwi9e they’ll Uy IO get you with a . loophole.\” Aslanian said he spends most of his time\u00b7 helping die needy get through lhe welfmesystem. \”YOU HA VE ID bep in IOIEh with the people you iepresent,\” he said \”It makes me remember when rm lobbying that I just spoke to a woman this morning who can’t pay the rent &his month because she was cut off (of welfare) for not showing up to an appointment. \ufffd me, it makes it more real, rather than an abstract coocepL\” Aslanian said he is frustrated because people don’t really understand poverty and have many misco\ufffdns about the po

pdf 1986 – December 30 – Santa Rosa Press Democrat – 'Workfare' officials, critics battle over program's efforts

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pdf 1986 – January 11 – CCWRO Press Clipping- Sacramento Bee- Familiar cries over health, welfare funds

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pdf 1986 – January 31 – Bakersfield Californian – Legal services group attacks Kern workfare plan

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1986 – January 31 – Bakersfield Californian – Legal services group attacks Kern workfare plan.pdf

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