Budget Supplemental Reports

pdf 2022-2023 State Budget Supplemental Report-LAO

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supplemental-report-2022.pdf

” TO: AGENCY SECRETARIES DEPARTMENT HEADS BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS The Supplemental Report of the 2022-23 Budget Act contains statements of legislative intent that were adopted during deliberations on the 2022-23 budget package. Please distribute your responses to the supplemental report, and any other report or document you are required to submit, to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC), as follows: One Hard Copy of the Report and Transmittal Letter to: Ms. Erika Contreras, Secretary of the Senate State Capitol, Room 3044 Sacramento, CA 95814 An Electronic Copy of the Report and Transmittal Letter to Each of the Following: Joint Legislative Budget Committee: [email protected] for distribution to the JLBC Members. Hon. Nancy Skinner, Chair, Joint Legislative Budget Committee 1020 N Street, Room 553, Sacramento, CA 95814 Legislative Analyst’s Office: [email protected] 925 L Street, Suite 1000, Sacramento, CA 95814 Office of the Chief Clerk of the Assembly: [email protected], [email protected], and [email protected] Ms. Sue Parker, Chief Clerk of the Assembly Room 3196, State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814 Legislative Counsel Bureau: [email protected] Office of Legislative Counsel Indexing Division 925 L Street, Suite 1105, Sacramento, CA 95814-3703 In the report, as well as in your transmittal letter to Senator Skinner, please cite the 11-digit budget item number(s) and the budget year or other statutory reference to which the response relates. If you have any questions, you may contact the Legislative Analyst’s Office at (916) 445-4656. mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] Containing Statements of Intent And Requests for Studies Adopted by the Legislature Supplemental Report of the 2022-23 Budget Act Compiled by the L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E September 2022 i 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT i Table of ConTenTs Legislative, Judicial, and Executive Item 0521-001-0042\u2014California State Transportation Agency ………………………………………….. 1 Item 0840-001-0001\u2014State Controller ………………………………………………………………………….. 1 Transportation Item 2720-001-0001\u2014California Highway Patrol …………………………………………………………….. 2 Health and Human Services Item 4265-001-0080\u2014Department of Public Health ………………………………………………………… 3 Items 4300-001-0001, 4300-101-0001\u2014Department of Developmental Services ………………… 4 Item 5180-001-0001 and 5180-151-0001\/0890\u2014Department of Social Services …….. ERRATA 5 Government Operations Item 7502-001-0001\u2014Department of Technology …………………………………………………………… 6 Item 7730-001-0001\u2014Franchise Tax Board ……………………………………………………………………. 6 General Government Item 8860-001-3342\u2014Department of Finance ………………………………………………………………… 7 1 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT 1 legislaTive, JudiCial, and exeCuTive Item 0521-001-0042\u2014California State Transportation Agency 1. California State Transportation Agency (CalSTA) Operational Needs. On or before January 1, 2025, CalSTA shall submit to the relevant budget subcommittees of each house and the Legislative Analyst’s Office a report on its efforts to coordinate statewide freight policy. The intent of this report is to provide the Legislature a clear understanding of the activities and accomplishments of CalSTA’s Freight Policy Team and how they differ from those of other state departments, such as the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (GO-Biz). This report shall include, but not be limited to: Information about the specific activities undertaken by the Freight Policy Team. This shall include detailed descriptions of (1) the activities the Freight Policy Team has conducted to coordinate freight policy across state government, such as GO-Biz, the California Air Resources Board, and the California Department of Transportation, and (2) the Freight Policy Team’s outreach efforts to stakeholders from federal, state, and local governments; the private sector; nongovernmental organizations; and academia. This report shall also include descriptions of how the activities undertaken by the Freight Policy Team differ from the activities of these other state agencies. Identification of the specific, measurable outcomes achieved by the Freight Policy Team during the funding period. Item 0840-001-0001\u2014State Controller 1. Year-End Close Fiscal Reporting. The State Controller’s Office will report to the budget committees of each house of the Legislature on March 1, 2023 the department name, fund name, and closure date on any funds not closed out for the 2021-22 fiscal year by November 1, 2022. It is the intent of the Legislature to review this list and require departments with profound, chronic, or unexplained delinquency in reporting to testify to the budget committees about the path toward correcting this deficiency. 2 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT 2 TransporTaTion Item 2720-001-0001\u2014California Highway Patrol 1. Highway Violence Task Force. The California Highway Patrol shall report to the relevant budget subcommittees by January 1, 2025 on the numbers, types, and locations of highway violence incidents, the associated factors in these incidents, as well as the outcomes of the investigatory resources (such as the number of arrests, training provided, and the benefits and lessons learned from the deployment of the requested software and equipment). 3 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT 3 HealTH and Human serviCes Item 4265-001-0080\u2014Department of Public Health 1. Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (CLPP) Program. On or before January 1, 2023, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) shall submit a report on the CLPP Program to the fiscal, budget, and relevant policy committees of the Legislature and the Legislative Analyst’s Office and post this report on its website. The report shall focus primarily on fiscal aspects of the CLPP Program to help the Legislature ascertain whether (1) funding levels for the program are adequate to fully meet the program’s statutory responsibilities in respect to protecting children and (2) state and local programs have adequate workforce and technical capacity to effectively implement program requirements. The report shall include, but not be limited to, the following information: (a) How CDPH assesses state-funded program costs for the CDPH’s CLPP Branch and local contracted CLPP programs that collectively administer the CLPP Program. This description shall include, but not be limited to, information about: (i) How CDPH determines the scope of the CLPP Program and which specific state and local costs are included in the assessment of total program cost. (ii) How CDPH uses this assessment to determine CLPP fee levels. (iii) How CDPH factors in costs to serve all children eligible for either basic case management or full case management. (iv) How the scope and cost of prevention, outreach, and education activities are determined and factored into total program cost. (v) How CDPH determines the scope of environmental services (including environmental investigation and assistance with lead remediation) provided by the state-run program and by local contracted programs, how it determines which homes\/sites will receive environmental services, how it assesses the costs of these services, and which specific costs are included. (vi) How CDPH determines the total amount of funding it will provide to local contracted CLPP programs, including how CDPH collects, assesses, and incorporates information from local contracted CLPP programs about their costs and which specific local costs are covered and not covered by local contracts with CDPH. (vii) How CDPH factors in information technology (IT) costs and what effect, if any, this has on other programmatic funding. (viii) Whether the CLLP Branch or local contracted CLPP programs have any workforce shortages, and if so, to what degree and in which positions. (b) Information from non-contracted local health jurisdictions to understand why they opt to have the state CLPP Branch run programs in their areas. (c) Information about the scope of environmental remediation services going forward, including prospects for continuing to receive federal grant funding for this purpose and data on the proportion of homes\/sites that state and local CLPP programs typically serve out of the total number of homes\/sites that need remediation. 4 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT 4 (d) Whether the program has sufficient funding to support all eligible children and how CDPH addresses funding shortfalls when they are identified. (e) An assessment of whether the CLPP fee is a sustainable source of funding going forward and how relying exclusively on this funding source specifically affects the scope of the program. (f) Information about appropriations and expenditures to date for the Surveillance, Health, Intervention, and Environmental Lead Database IT project; a narrative explanation about what drives the project’s costs and why other states’ similar systems are much less costly; and a description of CDPH’s plan to finish the project, including, if available, any rough estimates of total cost and timing. (g) For each of the three previous fiscal years, statistics on children served, which should include, but not be limited to: (i) Number of the children provided full case management and their blood lead levels: (1) statewide, (2) by local health jurisdiction, and (3) by demographic group. (ii) Number of the children provided basic case management and their blood lead levels: (1) statewide, (2) by local health jurisdiction, and (3) by demographic group. (iii) Number of children with blood lead levels below ten micrograms per deciliter (mcg\/dL) who receive full case management, noting in which local health jurisdictions the children live. (iv) Which local health jurisdictions provide full case management to children with blood lead levels below ten mcg\/dL and how many of the affected children are receiving the services. (v) Number of children with elevated blood lead levels (above 3.5 mcg\/dL) who are not receiving any services: (1) statewide, (2) by local health jurisdiction, and (3) by demographic group. Items 4300-001-0001, 4300-101-0001\u2014Department of Developmental Services 1. Service Access and Equity Grants. Beginning January 10, 2023, the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) shall provide annual written updates to the budget, policy, and leadership staff of each house and the Legislative Analyst’s Office on Service Access and Equity Grant awards. Updates shall also be presented verbally, as necessary, at the quarterly meetings with legislative staff that occur pursuant to current law and include regional center representatives. The updates shall include: (1) the number of grant applications received by the Department; (2) the number and nature of approved grants, both statewide and by regional center; (3) the awarded grant levels; (4) the number of disapproved grants and the reason for disapproval, both statewide and by regional center; and (5) the geographic distribution of awarded grants. The department shall provide an update, as part of the 2023 May Revision, on the findings and recommendations of the evaluation required in Welfare and Institutions Code section 4519.5 of the efforts to promote equity and reduce disparities. 5 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT 5 Beginning with the 2023-24 fiscal year, and the update that is made by January 10, 2024, DDS shall provide updates on how it will continue to assess outcomes of the funded grants and the impact that funded programs have on the efforts to promote equity and reduce disparities in the DDS system. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT E R R ATA PAG E 6 Items 5180-001-0001 and 5180-151-0001\/0890\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Federal Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) Implementation Monitoring, Reporting, and Outcomes Tracking. FFPSA Part IV Congregate Care Requirements. On or before February 1, 2023 and every six months thereafter until after October 1, 2027, the Department of Social Services (DSS) in coordination with the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS)\u2014and with input from the County Welfare Directors Association, Chief Probation Officers of California, County Behavioral Health Directors Association, County Mental Health Plans, tribes, Short-Term Residential Therapeutic Programs, wraparound service providers, the Judicial Council, individuals with lived experience, advocates, and other stakeholders where appropriate\u2014shall provide written updates to the budget, policy, and leadership staff of each house and the Legislative Analyst’s Office regarding various elements of implementing congregate care requirements imposed by Part IV of the federal Family First Prevention Services Act. Presentation of the updates may occur in the quarterly meetings as required by current law for the Continuum of Care Reform (CCR) effort. Components of the written updates shall include, to the extent reasonably possible and if the necessary information is provided to DSS by its state, county, and provider partners, the following: Qualified Individuals. An update on qualified individual assessments of congregate care placements pursuant to the Welfare and Institutions Code (WIC) Section 4096(g). The update should include any evaluations of qualified individual assessment data made by DSS if and when such data is obtained by DSS, and updates about any challenges, as reported to DSS or DHCS, counties face around implementing qualified individual requirements\u2014as well as technical assistance DSS and DHCS are providing to overcome those challenges. Nursing Services. An update on the nursing resources established pursuant to WIC Section 4096.55, including the number of calls handled each month and any other shareable data obtained through the state contract that provides access to nursing resources 24 hours a day 7 days a week as required by WIC Section 4096.55(b)(1). The update should include information regarding any challenges around implementing the requirements that STRTPs have reported to DSS or DHCS\u2014as well as technical assistance DSS and DHCS are providing to overcome those challenges. Aftercare. An update on any challenges providers, county placing agencies, and Mental Health Plans report to DSS or DHCS regarding providing, arranging for, or ensuring the provision of at least six months of post-discharge aftercare services to youth discharged from a placement in an STRTP to a family-based setting, pursuant to WIC Section 4096.6. Until a permanent model for aftercare is developed, the update should include a qualitative description of the type and models of aftercare being provided, as reported to DSS and DHCS pursuant to WIC Section 4096.6(d). The update also should describe progress developing and implementing the California high-fidelity wraparound model. Court Review and Case Plan Requirements. An update on implementation of new case plan documentation and court reports and court review requirements. The update should include any challenges around implementing the requirements\u2014along with an overview of any technical assistance DSS and Judicial Council are providing to overcome those challenges. 5 – 1 LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT E R R ATA PAG E 7 Tracking Otherwise Federally Eligible Placements. An update on otherwise federally eligible youth who are placed in residential facilities that do not meet qualified residential treatment program (QRTP) criteria, or youth for whom the requirements for placement into an QRTP are not met. The update should include information such as how many otherwise federally eligible youths fall into these categories, and a summary of the reasons why criteria for federal financial participation are not met. FFPSA Part I and Comprehensive Prevention Services. On or before February 1, 2023 and every six months thereafter until after October 1, 2027, the Department of Social Services\u2014with input from the County Welfare Directors Association, Chief Probation Officers of California, tribes, and community stakeholders\u2014shall provide written updates to the budget, policy, and leadership staff of each house and the Legislative Analyst’s Office regarding the status of implementing the Family First Prevention Services Program (the state’s prevention program), including services eligible for Title IV-E matching funds pursuant to Part I of the federal Family First Prevention Services Act. Information necessary for the updates may be obtained through county comprehensive plans and established processes within the continuous quality improvement framework as outlined in WIC Section 16587. Presentation of the updates may occur in the quarterly meetings as required by current law for the CCR effort. Components of the written updates shall include, to the extent reasonably possible and if the information is provided to DSS by its state, county, tribes, and provider partners, the following: Preparedness and Planning. An update on which counties express intent to opt into the Family First Prevention Services Program and those counties’ progress completing optional capacity and readiness assessments, as well as required asset mapping and needs assessments for the selection of prevention strategies and evidence-based practices, as described by the CDSS All County Letter 22-23. In particular, an update on how counties are engaging and collaborating with tribes, individuals and families with lived experience, historically underserved communities and specifically inclusive of engaging families of color and tribes that are disproportionately represented in the child welfare system, and other stakeholders as described in WIC 16587 and in the state’s Five-Year Title IV-E Prevention Plan. State Plan and Local Comprehensive Prevention Plans. An update on the state’s Five-Year Title IV-E Prevention Plan as well as on the counties’ comprehensive prevention plans as outlined in WIC Sections 16585 through 16589. Information should include the prevention services eligible for Title IV-E matching funds included in the state plan; updates on stakeholder, interagency collaboration, and tribal engagement and feedback regarding the state plan; and the types of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention services that counties include in their comprehensive prevention plans. Culturally Responsive Services. An update on the specific interventions and strategies counties include in their comprehensive prevention plans that are culturally appropriate and responsive and tailored to meet the needs of local families who are disproportionately represented in the child welfare system including Native American and Alaskan Native families, families of color, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer\/plus, children or youth as per the requirements set forth in WIC Section 16588(c)(2). Federally Required Data Collection and Reporting. An update on the progress toward developing and implementing the necessary capacities within the Child Welfare Services’ California Response and Engagement System (CWS-CARES), which DSS expects will be 5 – 2 LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT E R R ATA PAG E 8 utilized as the statewide automation system to collect required data for federal reporting under the Title IV-E prevention program. The update also should include information on any work arounds the counties are implementing before the capacity is built in CWS-CARES, and when the functionality is expected to be built into CWS-CARES. Once these capacities have been implemented, written updates to the Legislature also shall include a summary of the federally required data, including: basic demographic information for children and families served; whether children and families access services through the county, tribal, or community pathway (as described in the state’s Five-Year Title IV-E Prevention Plan); most common types of services provided to children\/families; average expenditures for the various services provided; average duration of services; system involvement including placement status following the receipt of services; and the extent to which the provision of services reduces the likelihood of foster care placement, increases the use of kinship care arrangements, and improves child well-being. Placements With Parents in Licensed Treatment Facilities. An update on the extent to which counties are exercising the federal option for providing Title IV-E eligible foster care maintenance payments for children who are placed with a parent in a licensed residential family based substance abuse treatment facility under a Voluntary Placement Agreement, as described in WIC Section 11402(m). Tracking Efforts to Reduce Disparities. An update on any departmental efforts to establish measurable indicators and specific targets and timelines for reducing disparities in the child welfare system, as reducing disparities is a goal referenced in the state’s Five-Year Title IV-E Prevention Plan. This update also should include progress on efforts referenced in the state’s Five-Year Title IV-E Prevention Plan to increase and expand relevant trainings, such as cultural humility and implicit bias trainings, within county child welfare agencies and probation departments to reduce racial biases. 5 – 3 6 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT 6 governmenT operaTions Item 7502-001-0001\u2014Department of Technology 1. Nonreporting Entities’ Information Security (IS) Compliance. On or before November 18, 2022, the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) shall submit a report to the relevant budget subcommittees and policy committees of each house of the Legislature on the IS compliance of nonreporting entities\u2014that is, those entities that fall outside of the Governor’s direct authority and are not required by state law to comply with and report on IS policies and procedures set by the California Department of Technology (CDT). The report shall, at a minimum: (a) Identify each of the nonreporting entities. (b) Consider whether some nonreporting entities could benefit from compliance with and reporting on IS policies and procedures similar to those set by CDT based on, but not limited to, nonreporting entities’: (i) Current role and criticality of functions within California state government. (ii) Current IS practices and procedures. (iii) Types and use of external oversight mechanisms (such as compliance audits and technical security assessments). (iv) Identified IS weaknesses and plans for remediation. (c) Provide options for the Legislature to consider to improve nonreporting entities’ IS compliance so as to be at least comparable to reporting entities and to achieve a maturity level that reflects the development and implementation of foundational IS program practices and procedures. Any confidential information collected from nonreporting entities and used by the LAO to prepare this report shall remain confidential in conformance with state law. Item 7730-001-0001\u2014Franchise Tax Board 1. Estimated Payment Dates. On or before March 1, 2023, the Legislative Analyst’s Office shall report to legislative budget and revenue and taxation committees on the fiscal impacts and state administrative costs of changing personal and corporate income tax estimated payment amounts to 25 percent per quarter beginning in tax year 2024, thereby returning to the estimated tax payment policy in place prior to the Great Recession. 7 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT 7 general governmenT Item 8860-001-3342\u2014Department of Finance 1. Cannabis Tax Fund Transparency. By March 1, 2023, and on the same date until 2025, the Department of Finance (DOF) shall submit a report to the Legislative Analyst’s Office, relevant policy committees, and the relevant budget committees of each house of the Legislature with the following information: (a) The amount of funds from the Cannabis Tax Fund allocated in the prior year, past year, and current year to each of the departments and agencies identified in Section 34019 of the Revenue and Taxation Code. (b) The actual expenditures of funds from the Cannabis Tax Fund that were allocated in the prior year and past year to each of the departments and agencies identified in Section 34019, and presented by uses pursuant to subdivisions (a), (b), (c) (d), and (f) of Section 34019. (c) The total remaining balance from across fiscal years that each department and agency identified in Section 34019 has available for carryover from the Cannabis Tax Fund. For purposes of providing the actual expenditures of funds provided to departments and agencies pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 34019 and the remaining balances, the expenditure information shall be presented distinctly from other Cannabis Tax Fund revenues that the departments and agencies may receive from subdivisions (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of Section 34019. In order to submit the report described above, DOF shall coordinate and include the following: (a) Information provided by the Department of Health Care Services, including: (i) The total amount deposited into the Youth Education, Prevention, Early Intervention and Treatment Account in the prior year and past year. (ii) The actual expenditures from the prior year and past year from the Youth Education, Prevention, Early Intervention and Treatment Account, categorized by program, including any subgrants, and the number of actual childcare slots funded. (iii) Any remaining balance received from the Youth Education, Prevention, Early Intervention and Treatment Account across fiscal years. (iv) Any evaluations conducted by the departments pursuant to subparagraph (L) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 34019. (b) Information provided by the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency, including: (i) The total amount deposited into the Environmental Restoration and Protection Account in the prior year and past year. (ii) The actual expenditures from the prior year and past year from the Environmental Restoration and Protection Account, including any subgrants. This information shall include: the funds appropriated to and actual expenditures from the Cannabis Restoration Grant Program for cleanup, remediation, or restoration of environmental damage affected by cannabis cultivation and related activities pursuant to subparagraph (A) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (f) of Section 34019; 8 1 1LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2022-23 BUDGET ACT 8 the funds appropriated to and actual expenditures for stewardship of state-owned wildlife habitat areas and state park units associated with each site pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (f) of Section 34019; the actual expenditures of the Department of Fish and Wildlife from the Environmental Restoration and Protection Account, categorized by a list of the type of the department’s expenditures pursuant to subparagraph (A, B, and C) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (f) of Section 34019; and any remaining balances of funds received from the Environmental Restoration and Protection Account across fiscal years. (c) Information provided by the California Highway Patrol, including: (i) The actual expenditures from the prior year and past year categorized by program from the State and Local Government Law Enforcement Account, including any subgrants. (ii) Any remaining balances of funds received from the State and Local Government Law Enforcement Account across fiscal years. (d) Information provided by the Board of State and Community Corrections, including: (i) The actual expenditures from the prior year and past year categorized by program from the State and Local Government Law Enforcement Account, including any subgrants. (ii) Any remaining balances of funds received from the State and Local Government Law Enforcement Account the across fiscal years. DOF may provide estimates of this information if the Legislature requests this report at a date earlier than specified above. Transmittal Letter 220325_ ”

pdf 2021-2022 State Budget Supplemental Report

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Supplemental Language Reeport for FY 2021-2022.pdf

” Preprinted logo will go here TO: AGENCY SECRETARIES DEPARTMENT HEADS BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS The Supplemental Report of the 2021-22 Budget Act contains statements of legislative intent that were adopted during deliberations on the 2021-22 budget package. Please distribute your responses to the supplemental report, and any other report or document you are required to submit, to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC), as follows: One Hard Copy of the Report and Transmittal Letter to: Ms. Erika Contreras, Secretary of the Senate State Capitol, Room 3044 Sacramento, CA 95814 An Electronic Copy of the Report and Transmittal Letter to Each of the Following: Joint Legislative Budget Committee: [email protected] for distribution to the JLBC Members. Hon. Nancy Skinner, Chair, Joint Legislative Budget Committee 1020 N Street, Room 553, Sacramento, CA 95814 Legislative Analyst’s Office: [email protected] 925 L Street, Suite 1000, Sacramento, CA 95814 Office of the Chief Clerk of the Assembly: [email protected], [email protected], and [email protected] Ms. Sue Parker, Chief Clerk of the Assembly Room 3196, State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814 Legislative Counsel Bureau: [email protected] Office of Legislative Counsel Indexing Division 925 L Street, Suite 1105, Sacramento, CA 95814-3703 In the report, as well as in your transmittal letter to Senator Skinner, please cite the 11-digit budget item number(s) and the budget year or other statutory reference to which the response relates. If you have any questions, you may contact the Legislative Analyst’s Office at (916) 445-4656. mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] Containing Statements of Intent And Requests for Studies Adopted by the Legislature Supplemental Report of the 2021-22 Budget Act Compiled by the L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E September 2021 LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT ii Table of Contents Legislative, Judicial, and Executive Item 0820-001-3086\u2014Department of Justice …………………………………………………….. 1 Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Item 1115-001-3288\u2014Department of Cannabis Control ………………………………………… 2 Natural Resources Item 3540-001-0001\u2014California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection …………….. 4 Item 3600-001-0001\u2014California Department of Fish and Wildlife ……………………………. 4 Item 3900-001-3237\u2014California Air Resources Board ………………………………………….. 5 Health and Human Services Item 4440-011-0001\u2014Department of State Hospitals …………………………………………… 6 Item 5175-101-0001\u2014Department of Child Support Services …………………………………. 6 Item 5180-101-0001\u2014Department of Social Services …………………………………………… 7 Corrections and Rehabilitation Item 5225-001-0001\u2014California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation …………. 8 Education Item 6100-161-0890\u2014California Department of Education…………………………………… 10 Item 6440-001-0001\u2014University of California …………………………………………………… 10 General Government Item 8570-102-0001\u2014California Department of Food and Agriculture ……………………. 11 LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 1 LegisLative, JudiciaL, and executive Item 0820-001-3086\u2014Department of Justice 1. Alternative Ways to Fund the Bureau of Forensic Service (BFS). No later than March 10, 2022, the Department of Justice (DOJ) shall submit a report identifying various options\u2014other than the state General Fund\u2014to fund the annual operations of BFS. Operational costs shall include facility and annual equipment replacement costs. One such option shall include sharing costs with local agencies that make use of BFS services based on the specific type of forensic services sought, the speed of service, the size of the agency, and any other factors DOJ would like to consider. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 2 Business, consumer services, and Housing Item 1115-001-3288\u2014Department of Cannabis Control 1. Annual and Provisional Licenses. (a) On or before October 1, 2022, the Department of Cannabis Control shall submit a report to the fiscal, budget, and relevant policy committees of the Legislature and the Legislative Analyst’s Office and post this report on its website. The report shall include at least the following information, disaggregated by local jurisdiction: (i) The total number of active annual licenses. (ii) The total number of provisional licenses issued beginning July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022 that did not result in a licensee holding multiple cultivation licenses on contiguous premises exceeding one acre of total canopy for outdoor cultivation or 22,000 square feet for mixed-light or indoor cultivation. (iii) The total number of provisional licenses issued beginning July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022 that resulted in a licensee holding multiple cultivation licenses on contiguous premises exceeding one acre of total canopy for outdoor cultivation or 22,000 square feet for mixed-light or indoor cultivation. (iv) The total number of active provisional licenses. (v) The total number of provisional licenses that transitioned to annual licenses between July 1, 2021 and June 30, 2022. (vi) The total number of applications submitted between July 1, 2021 and March 31, 2022 that were denied. (b) On or before March 1, 2023, and annually thereafter through 2025, the Department of Cannabis Control shall include in its annual report at least the following information, disaggregated by local jurisdiction, for the prior fiscal year: (i) The total number of active annual licenses. (ii) The total number of active provisional licenses. (iii) The total number of provisional licenses that transitioned to annual licenses. (iv) The total number of provisional licenses renewed that did not result in a licensee holding multiple cultivation licenses on contiguous premises exceeding one acre of total canopy for outdoor cultivation or 22,000 square feet for mixed-light or indoor cultivation. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 3 (v) The total number of provisional licenses renewed that resulted in a licensee holding multiple cultivation licenses on contiguous premises exceeding one acre of total canopy for outdoor cultivation or 22,000 square feet for mixed- light or indoor cultivation. (vi) The total number of provisional licenses that were not renewed for failure to meet the renewal requirements in Business and Professions Code section 26050.2 and the aggregated reasons those licenses were unable to be renewed. (vii) The total number of provisional licenses that were revoked or suspended pursuant to Business and Professions Code section 26050.2 subdivision (i). (viii) The total number of revoked or suspended pursuant to Business and Professions Code section 26050.2 subdivision (i) on or after July 12, 2021. (ix) A narrative explanation of any of the trends displayed in the data provided, including how they might differ from previous years. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 4 naturaL resources Item 3540-001-0001\u2014California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection 1. Forestry Management Training Center Options. The Legislative Analyst’s Office shall consult with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection and other appropriate stakeholders, including the California Conservation Corps, to develop options for the Legislature to consider for creating a forestry management training center in Northern California. It is the intent of the Legislature to consider approving the center during the budget process for the 2022-23 state budget. Item 3600-001-0001\u2014California Department of Fish and Wildlife 1. Lake and Streambed Alteration Agreements for Cannabis Cultivation Projects. On or before October 1, 2022, and on or before March 1, 2023 and annually thereafter through 2025, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shall submit a report on Lake and Streambed Alteration Agreements for cannabis cultivation projects to the fiscal, budget, and relevant policy committees of the Legislature and the Legislative Analyst’s Office. The report shall include the following information for the preceding year: (a) The number and types of notifications described in Section 1602 of the Fish and Game Code submitted to the department and under review, separated by the following categories: (i) The number of notifications deemed complete by the department. (ii) The number of notifications deemed incomplete. (iii) The number of notifications deemed incomplete more than once. (iv) The number of notifications that have been deemed not responsive pursuant to Business and Professions Code section 26050.2, subdivision (a)(1)(D)(iv). (v) The average length of time elapsed between the initial submission of a notification by an applicant and when the notification is deemed complete by the department, further clarified by the average time the notification is with the applicant and the average time it is with the department, during the prior year. (vi) A brief summary identifying, in general terms, why the majority of submitted notifications were deemed incomplete. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 5 (b) The number of draft agreements in process by the department at the beginning of the year. (i) The number of draft agreements that were sent to the applicant by the department that have not been signed and returned to the department by the applicant at the beginning of the year. (ii) The number of draft agreements that have been signed and returned to the department during the prior year. (iii) The average length of time elapsed between the submission of a completed notification and when an agreement is signed and returned during the prior year. (c) The number of final agreements the department issued during the prior year. (d) A narrative explanation of trends displayed in the data provided, if any, including how they might differ from previous years. (e) An assessment of the adequacy of the department’s staffing level to process agreements for cannabis cultivation projects on a timely basis. Item 3900-001-3237\u2014California Air Resources Board 1. Preliminary Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Estimates. For three years, beginning in 2022, on or before April 1 of each year, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) shall post publicly on its website and report to the relevant policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature, a preliminary estimate of the prior-year GHG emissions based on currently available data and an update to any prior estimate previously provided for any calendar year that is not included in the most recent GHG emissions inventory report required pursuant to Health and Safety Code Section 39607.4. The estimate shall include estimates for GHG emissions from transportation; electric power; industrial, commercial and residential; agriculture; high global warming potential; and recycling and solid waste sectors. In preparing the annual estimate, the CARB may rely on data sources including, but not limited to: State vehicle fuels tax receipts. California Independent System Operator GHG monthly emissions estimates. Data reported under the Mandatory Reporting Regulation. Industrial economic activity data. Previously issued CARB GHG emissions inventory reports. Other available economic and emissions data that has been independently developed, researched, and verified. To the extent feasible, the data and methods for developing a preliminary estimate of prior-year GHG emissions shall be transparent and publicly accessible. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 6 HeaLtH and Human services Item 4440-011-0001\u2014Department of State Hospitals 1. Financial Assistance Policy. The Department of State Hospitals shall report to legislative fiscal committees no later than January 10, 2022 an assessment of existing law and guidance pertaining to patient and family member financial liability for care and treatment at a state hospital facility, the necessity of those laws in obtaining Medicare reimbursement including discussions with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services regarding the development of financial assistance policies’ impact on federal reimbursement, recommendations regarding patient relief from financial impact, and the financial impact of the recommendations. In determining the financial impact, include the following data by fiscal year: Number of patients served each year from January 1, 2018 to present. Amounts collected directly from patients from January 1, 2018 to present. Amounts collected from individuals and estates other than directly from the patient, from January 1, 2018 to present. Amounts collected from Medicare, from January 1, 2018 to present. Amounts collected from other payers, from January 1, 2018 to present. Lawsuits filed against patients for collection of owed amounts, from January 1, 2018 to present. Existing financial assistance policy and criteria, including informal policies and criteria, by state hospital, used from January 1, 2018 to present. Number and percentage of individuals who requested financial assistance with their bills from January 1, 2018 to present, and the number and percentage of requests that were reduced, cancelled, or remitted. Item 5175-101-0001\u2014Department of Child Support Services 1. Caseload Ratios. The Department of Child Support Services shall provide written quarterly updates, commencing December 1, 2021, to the Legislature regarding case-to-staffing ratios, compared to the goal ratio, across the 49 Local Child Support Agencies (LCSAs). The information should be presented individually, identifying under- and over-funded LCSAs, and indicating the statewide average in order to show the improvement or lack thereof of meeting the desired case-to-staffing ratio ultimately for all LCSAs, with an estimate to be provided in the January 2022 Governor’s budget of how much funding is expected, both in the aggregate and for each LCSA, to bring all LCSAs to the goal case-to-staffing ratio. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 7 Item 5180-101-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. CalWORKs Home Visiting Program. The Department of Social Services shall provide an update to the Legislature on the status of the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) Home Visiting program through at least two meetings to be conducted at mutually agreeable times in the fall of 2021. The meetings shall include county directors and county association representatives, advocacy partners, and legislative staff. The update shall include a conversation on fostering the resurgence of the program in the 2021-22 fiscal year, an inventory of impediments for families to access services in the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and leading out of it, and strategies for overcoming these barriers where possible and to engage eligible families to the maximum extent feasible. Additionally, to the extent available, quantitative and qualitative information on program utilization and outcomes during the pandemic shall be included. The updates shall include a discussion of the current expenditure-based funding methodology for the program and the benefits and trade- offs of returning to a projected growth funding methodology for the program. 2. Homelessness and Housing Data Tracking. The Department of Social Services shall provide written quarterly updates, commencing October 1, 2021, on the progress being made toward the development of the single homelessness and housing data reporting solution. The department shall also provide information to and collaborate with the Legislature on the kinds of historical, current, and contextual information that the projected solution provides about housing stability and instability, homelessness, and housing and rental cost needs of people served by all of the major programs administered by the Department of Social Services. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 8 corrections and reHaBiLitation Item 5225-001-0001\u2014California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation 1. Prison Infrastructure Improvement Strategy. On or before January 10, 2022, the department shall submit to the budget committees of each house of the Legislature and the Legislative Analyst’s Office a report identifying and prioritizing all special repair and deferred maintenance projects and capital outlay projects estimated to cost over $5,000,000 that are likely to be needed within the next ten years. Furthermore, the department shall describe its process for identifying and prioritizing these projects as well as what viable alternatives it considered. This supplemental report language shall supersede the supplemental report language of the same title adopted with the 2020-21 Budget Act. (a) For each project identified, the department shall report all of the following information: (i) A brief description of the project, its estimated cost, the estimated time to complete the project, and why it is needed. (ii) Whether it would be funded as a major capital outlay project or from the support budget for special repair or deferred maintenance. (iii) The category of need it addresses, including fire\/life safety, rehabilitative or health care programming, staff and population safety, or court-ordered or regulatory requirements. (iv) In cases when a significant portion of a facility is identified for repair or replacement, via one or multiple projects, the department shall explain what viable alternatives to rebuilding or repairing the facility it considered, such as redesigning, consolidating, or relocating facilities to achieve better outcomes or lower operational costs. (b) In identifying the projects, the department shall seek opportunities to consolidate prisons to achieve efficiencies. (c) The department shall describe how the identified projects support a long-term, durable portfolio of facilities to meet the department’s mission and the state’s long-term need for prison capacity. (d) The department shall describe the steps taken in the project planning and prioritization process to minimize investments in prisons that may be included in closure decisions beyond the number of closures identified in Penal Code Section 5003.7 unless they are needed to ensure safe operation of the facility until it is closed. (e) If, after January 10, 2022, the department identifies changes to the projects reported pursuant to this supplemental report, it shall notify the budget LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 9 committees of both houses of the Legislature and the Legislative Analyst’s Office of the changes and the justification for these changes. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 10 education Item 6100-161-0890\u2014California Department of Education 1. Special Education Written State Complaints. The department shall report to the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature and the Department of Finance (DOF) on the number of special education written state complaints handled by the department and the number of cases handled by the Office of Administrative Hearings which are related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) school disruptions by August 1 of 2022 and 2023. In recognition of the potential for a higher volume of parent contacts regarding special education due to COVID-19 school disruptions, the department shall also report to the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature and DOF, by August 1, 2022, on their systems for the intake and management of parent questions and concerns, and with focus on how these systems reflect the full continuum of dispute resolution practices, including referrals to local resources for parent support and alternative dispute resolution practices. Item 6440-001-0001\u2014University of California 1. Office of the President. It is the intent of the Legislature to reconsider the University of California Office of the President line item and its budget prior to finalizing the 2022-23 budget. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2021-22 BUDGET ACT 11 generaL government Item 8570-102-0001\u2014California Department of Food and Agriculture 1. Farm to School Incubator Grant Program. No later than January, 1, 2024, the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) shall submit to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC) a report on key programmatic outcomes achieved by the Farm to School Incubator Grant Program. At minimum, this report shall include the following for each type of activity funded\u2014such as procurement of foods and educational opportunities\u2014from the Farm to School Incubator Grant Program: (1) the total number of grants and amount of funding awarded; (2) the number of schools and students served; (3) the number of schools and students served by applicable community need metrics (such as free\/reduced meal rates); (4) the geographic distribution of awarded grants; and (5) an assessment, to the extent feasible, on the degree to which the funded activities resulted in improved outcomes, such as increased awareness and consumption of healthier food options and improved academic outcomes. 2. Healthy Stores Refrigeration Grant Program. No later than January, 1, 2024, CDFA shall submit to JLBC a report on key programmatic outcomes achieved by the Healthy Stores Refrigeration Grant Program. At minimum, this report shall include: (1) the number of grants and amount of funding awarded by type of entity receiving funds (such as corner stores and food banks), (2) the number of grants and amount of funding awarded to low-access areas (as defined in Section 49015 of the Food and Agricultural Code), (3) the geographic distribution of awarded grants, and (4) an assessment of the impact of the program on grant recipients’ success at stocking and selling California- grown fresh produce and minimally processed foods within targeted communities. 3. Urban Agriculture Grant Program. No later than January, 1, 2024, CDFA shall submit to JLBC a report on key programmatic outcomes achieved by the Urban Agriculture Grant Program. At minimum, this report shall include: (1) the number of grants and amount of funding awarded by type of entity receiving funds, (2) the number of grants and amount of funding awarded by activity (such as infrastructure procurement and technical assistance), (3) the number of grants and amount of funding awarded in low-access areas (as defined in Section 49015 of the Food and Agricultural Code), (4) the geographic distribution of awarded grants, and (5) an assessment of the effectiveness of the program on increased access to healthier food options within targeted communities. 210386 _GoBack _GoBack _GoBack Legislative, Judicial, and Executive Item 0820-001-3086\u2014Department of Justice Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Item 1115-001-3288\u2014Department of Cannabis Control Natural Resources Item 3540-001-0001\u2014California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Item 3600-001-0001\u2014California Department of Fish and Wildlife Item 3900-001-3237\u2014California Air Resources Board Health and Human Services Item 4440-011-0001\u2014Department of State Hospitals Item 5175-101-0001\u2014Department of Child Support Services Item 5180-101-0001\u2014Department of Social Services Corrections and Rehabilitation Item 5225-001-0001\u2014California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Education Item 6100-161-0890\u2014California Department of Education Item 6440-001-0001\u2014University of California General Government Item 8570-102-0001\u2014California Department of Food and Agriculture Supplemental Report Letter ”

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” Preprinted logo will go here TO: AGENCY SECRETARIES DEPARTMENT HEADS BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS The Supplemental Report of the 2020-21 Budget Act contains statements of legislative intent that were adopted during deliberations on the 2020-21 budget package. Please distribute your responses to the supplemental report, and any other report or document you are required to submit, to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC), as follows: One Hard Copy of the Report and Transmittal Letter to: \uf0b7 Ms. Erika Contreras, Secretary of the Senate State Capitol, Room 3044 Sacramento, CA 95814 An Electronic Copy of the Report and Transmittal Letter to Each of the Following: \uf0b7 Joint Legislative Budget Committee: [email protected] for distribution to the JLBC Members. Hon. Holly J. Mitchell, Chair, Joint Legislative Budget Committee 1020 N Street, Room 553, Sacramento, CA 95814 \uf0b7 Legislative Analyst’s Office: [email protected] 925 L Street, Suite 1000, Sacramento, CA 95814 \uf0b7 Office of the Chief Clerk of the Assembly: [email protected], and [email protected] Ms. Sue Parker, Chief Clerk of the Assembly Room 3196, State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814 \uf0b7 Legislative Counsel Bureau: [email protected] Office of Legislative Counsel Indexing Division 925 L Street, Suite 1105, Sacramento, CA 95814-3703 In the report, as well as in your transmittal letter to Senator Mitchell, please cite the 11-digit budget item number(s) and the budget year or other statutory reference to which the response relates. If you have any questions, you may contact the Legislative Analyst’s Office at (916) 445-4656. mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] Containing Statements of Intent And Requests for Studies Adopted by the Legislature Supplemental Report of the 2020-21 Budget Act Compiled by the L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E July 2020 LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT i Table of ConTenTs Legislative, Judicial, and Executive Item 0250-101-0001\u2014Judicial Branch …………………………………………………………………….1 Item 0511-001-0001\u2014Government Operations Agency ……………………………………………..3 Item 0530-001-0001\u2014Secretary for the California Health and Human Services Agency …….4 Health and Human Services Item 4260-001-0001\u2014Department of Health Care Services …………………………………………5 Item 4300-101-0001\u2014Department of Developmental Services …………………………………….6 Item 5175-101-0001\u2014Department of Child Support Services ……………………………………….6 Corrections and Rehabilitation Item 5225-001-0001\u2014California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation ……………….9 Education Item 6100-161-0001\u2014California Department of Education ………………………………………… 11 Government Operations Item 7760-001-0666\u2014Department of General Services ……………………………………………12 LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 1 legislaTive, JudiCial, and exeCuTive Item 0250-101-0001\u2014Judicial Branch 1. Child Support Program Overview. The Department of Child Support Services (DCSS) and Judicial Council, in collaboration with the Child Support Directors Association of California, shall provide updates to the Legislature on key components of California’s child support program, program outcomes as it relates to the federal performance measures and DCSS state practice indicators, and overall experiences of parents and children served by the program. The updates shall include a discussion of qualitative information and, if collected and available given current resources, any quantitative data which shall be provided on a quarterly basis. The updates shall be in person if possible given state and Sacramento County specific public health guidelines and stay at home orders, unless otherwise agreed upon by the Legislature and Administration, and shall occur every three months beginning in August 2020 to July 2021 for a total of four meetings for the 12-month period starting August 2020. At the end of the reporting period, the frequency of the updates moving forward shall be decided between the Legislature, Judicial Council, DCSS, and the Child Support Directors Association together, which may result in a new iteration of this Supplemental Report Language. The agenda for each meeting shall be agreed upon by the Legislature, Judicial Council, DCSS, and the Child Support Directors Association prior to the meeting date. The updates shall include, but not be limited to, the following topics which can be spread across the four meetings: Order Establishment Process. A discussion on what factors local child support agencies (LCSAs) and courts use to determine the level of child support, including, but not limited to, providing information and data on zero orders, orders set under the guideline, orders established through stipulations versus default versus contested motions, orders established above or below the guideline amount, and orders established using actual income or presumed or imputed income. Additionally, a discussion of how often child support orders deviate from the guideline, as referenced above, and the major reason or reasons for deviation. A contested motion refers to any support order that is not stipulated or a default. Order Modification Process. A discussion and data, to the extent that data is obtainable given current resources, on how many modifications are established through stipulations versus default versus contested motions. For each of these categories, a discussion and data on how long it takes to review, file a motion for, and, if applicable, hear a request to modify a child support order. Additionally, a discussion and data on how many modified orders are set at zero orders, orders set under the guideline, orders established above or below the guideline amount, and orders established using presumed or imputed income. Additionally, a discussion on the major reasons for deviation. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 2 Ability to Pay. A discussion of how ability to pay is defined in child support and whether the guideline accurately captures the ability to pay for all obligors. If the guideline does not accurately capture an obligor’s ability to pay, a discussion of why that is the case, how LCSAs and courts currently address this, and possible solutions. Financial Support for Children. A discussion of the level of financial support needed for children, whether child support orders and payments align with the level of financial support needed for children, and how the disregard and recoupment rules affect the ability of child support payments to fully meet the financial needs of children. Information in this area may include data on what percentage and how many custodial parents request an increase in an order due to the current order’s inability to meet children’s needs. Collections. A discussion and data, to the extent that data is obtainable given current resources, by LCSAs on whether collection rates for current support and arrears vary by different types of child support orders, including stipulated orders versus default orders versus orders set by a contested motion, orders set under the guideline versus orders established above or below the guideline amount, and orders established using presumed or imputed income versus orders established using actual income. Additionally, a discussion and data on how average monthly child support payments and collection rates vary by obligors whose payments go to families versus obligors whose payments go to the government as public assistance recoupment. Child Support Arrears. A discussion of what arrears reduction assistance is available to obligors with state-owed and\/or family-owed child support arrears, effectiveness of the state’s Compromise of Arrears Program, and the impact of the state’s interest rate on the accumulation of child support arrears and collection rates. Additionally, a discussion and data on how average arrears amounts vary by never assisted, currently assisted, and formerly assisted cases, and by arrears owed to the state versus arrears owed to the family. Local Administrative Funding Update. An update on program efficiencies and improvements the department is implementing and their impact on LCSA workload, collections, and families; how much LCSAs spend on indirect and overhead expenditures versus direct service expenditures; how LCSAs are spending additional funding provided under the 2019-20 Budget Act and 2020-21 Budget Act; and how DCSS plans to align all LCSA funding levels to reflect calculated funding needs. Updates on spending provided under the 2019-20 Budget Act and 2020-21 Budget Act would be contingent on the federal funding trigger provided in the 2020-21 Budget Act. If federal funding is not provided, an update on how LCSAs are adapting to decreased funding levels, including the numbers and types of staff layoffs, and steps that LCSAs are taking to improve their efficiency. An update on how the metrics, outcomes, and processes above are impacted by the funding decreases. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 3 Update on Implementation of Flexibility, Efficiency, and Modernization in Child Support Final Rule. An update on the implementation of the Flexibility, Efficiency, and Modernization in Child Support Final Rule, including, but not limited to, case closure criteria, use of actual income of the obligor when setting support obligations rather than imputed or presumed income based on earning capacity, and modifying child support orders for incarcerated obligors. Update on Recommendations From Quadrennial Review. A summary of the findings and recommendations from the most recent quadrennial review; role of Judicial Council, LCSAs, and DCSS in implementing the recommendations; status of the current quadrennial review process; and expected involvement of stakeholders, including, but not limited to, families served by LCSAs, the Legislature, and local human services agencies. Local Initiatives. A discussion of past (over the past five fiscal years prior to 2020-21) and current child support-related initiatives and pilot programs implemented by LCSAs or local courts\u2014including, but not limited to, custody and visitation orders, domestic violence screenings, and employment services referrals\u2014and impact on collections, families and the well-being of children. This should also include a discussion of the benefits, costs, and considerations of making any successful local initiatives apply statewide. Item 0511-001-0001\u2014Government Operations Agency 1. Interagency Data Exchange Agreement Repository. The Legislature understands that the Chief Data Officer at the Government Operations Agency (GovOps), in consultation with the California Department of Technology, plans to develop a public repository of state government interagency data exchange agreements. To help the Legislature better understand how state government data is shared and used pursuant to these agreements, GovOps shall submit to the relevant budget and policy subcommittees of both houses and the Joint Legislative Budget Committee a report that contains a summary of the data use agreement and the following information for each business use case proposal in the repository: (a) All entities (including nongovernmental entities) participating in the data exchange, including entities that the data has been shared with or disclosed to. (b) The types of data exchanged, including whether the data has personally identifiable information. (c) The sources of the data exchanged. (d) The stated purpose of the agreement. (e) Any data retention policies in the agreement. (f) Measures taken to protect personally identifiable information from potential data breaches. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 4 Item 0530-001-0001\u2014Secretary for the California Health and Human Services Agency 1. CalHEERS’s Medi-Cal Eligibility Functionality. It is critical to the health and well- being of California’s communities for the Medi-Cal program to be accessible to individuals and families who need health coverage. A key component of the program’s success is efficient, effective county eligibility operations supported by comprehensive information technology. The Legislature is aware of issues raised during this budget cycle with the California Healthcare Eligibility, Enrollment, and Retention System’s (CalHEERS’s) Medi-Cal eligibility functionality. It is a legislative priority to ensure that these system issues are addressed in partnership with the counties and county staff who utilize the system. In response to the issues raised, the Legislature understands that the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) is developing a dashboard that will be used to enumerate CalHEERS issues related to Medi-Cal eligibility functionality, including, but not limited to, identified system defects, county- and worker-identified needs, and manual workarounds that county eligibility workers are performing. Subsequent activities to prioritize these issues and set time lines for addressing them will be undertaken in partnership with the CalHEERS Project Team and Covered California, and in collaboration with the County Welfare Directors Association, and the Services Employees International Union. The Legislature requests that DHCS share at least a draft version of the dashboard with the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO), no later than October 1, 2020, and that it share any updates to the dashboard with the LAO through the end of 2020-21. The Legislature further asks that DHCS and the Office of Systems Integration be prepared to report during hearings on the 2021-22 budget on the status of the dashboard, the collaborative efforts described above, and any related CalHEERS activities to remedy the identified Medi-Cal eligibility-related system issues. Subsequent to receiving the dashboard, and as updates are received, the LAO shall review the dashboard and gather information from the administration and stakeholders in order to provide an assessment of the following in its analysis of the Governor’s proposed 2021-22 budget: (a) Whether the dashboard comprehensively captures issues known to stakeholders and the administration that cause delays or errors in eligibility processing, (b) How the dashboard is being used as part of a process to set a time line for fixing the identified issues, and (c) Opportunities for legislative oversight. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 5 HealTH and Human serviCes Item 4260-001-0001\u2014Department of Health Care Services 1. CalHEERS’s Medi-Cal Eligibility Functionality. It is critical to the health and well- being of California’s communities for the Medi-Cal program to be accessible to individuals and families who need health coverage. A key component of the program’s success is efficient, effective county eligibility operations supported by comprehensive information technology. The Legislature is aware of issues raised during this budget cycle with the California Healthcare Eligibility, Enrollment, and Retention System’s (CalHEERS’s) Medi-Cal eligibility functionality. It is a legislative priority to ensure that these system issues are addressed in partnership with the counties and county staff who utilize the system. In response to the issues raised, the Legislature understands that the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) is developing a dashboard that will be used to enumerate CalHEERS issues related to Medi-Cal eligibility functionality, including, but not limited to, identified system defects, county- and worker-identified needs, and manual workarounds that county eligibility workers are performing. Subsequent activities to prioritize these issues and set time lines for addressing them will be undertaken in partnership with the CalHEERS Project Team and Covered California, and in collaboration with the County Welfare Directors Association, and the Services Employees International Union. The Legislature requests that DHCS share at least a draft version of the dashboard with the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO), no later than October 1, 2020, and that it share any updates to the dashboard with the LAO through the end of 2020-21. The Legislature further asks that DHCS and the Office of Systems Integration be prepared to report during hearings on the 2021-22 budget on the status of the dashboard, the collaborative efforts described above, and any related CalHEERS activities to remedy the identified Medi-Cal eligibility-related system issues. Subsequent to receiving the dashboard, and as updates are received, the LAO shall review the dashboard and gather information from the administration and stakeholders in order to provide an assessment of the following in its analysis of the Governor’s proposed 2021-22 budget: (a) Whether the dashboard comprehensively captures issues known to stakeholders and the administration that cause delays or errors in eligibility processing, (b) How the dashboard is being used as part of a process to set a time line for fixing the identified issues, and (c) Opportunities for legislative oversight. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 6 Item 4300-101-0001\u2014Department of Developmental Services 1. Enhancing Federal Financial Participation for Consumers Served by the Department of Developmental Services (DDS). The Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) shall evaluate the current processes for, and barriers associated with, enrolling DDS consumers in Medi-Cal and offer recommendations and options to address these barriers with the goal of increasing federal financial participation for regional center- coordinated services. The LAO shall consult with DDS, the Department of Health Care Services, the Department of Social Services, the County Welfare Directors’ Association, the Association of Regional Center Agencies, and program stakeholders in conducting its evaluation. The LAO shall deliver a written report to the health and human services budget subcommittees and the health and human services policy committees of both houses of the Legislature no later than March 1, 2021. The evaluation may consider opportunities for streamlining the enrollment process and educating consumers and their families\/representatives about Medi-Cal programs. The evaluation shall include an estimate of the potential General Fund savings resulting from increased federal financial participation, as well as the potential administrative costs and\/or costs of Medi-Cal services that are not coordinated by regional centers. Item 5175-101-0001\u2014Department of Child Support Services 1. Child Support Program Overview. The Department of Child Support Services (DCSS) and Judicial Council, in collaboration with the Child Support Directors Association of California, shall provide updates to the Legislature on key components of California’s child support program, program outcomes as it relates to the federal performance measures and DCSS state practice indicators, and overall experiences of parents and children served by the program. The updates shall include a discussion of qualitative information and, if collected and available given current resources, any quantitative data which shall be provided on a quarterly basis. The updates shall be in person if possible given state and Sacramento County specific public health guidelines and stay at home orders, unless otherwise agreed upon by the Legislature and Administration, and shall occur every three months beginning in August 2020 to July 2021 for a total of four meetings for the 12-month period starting August 2020. At the end of the reporting period, the frequency of the updates moving forward shall be decided between the Legislature, Judicial Council, DCSS, and the Child Support Directors Association together, which may result in a new iteration of this Supplemental Report Language. The agenda for each meeting shall be agreed upon by the Legislature, Judicial Council, DCSS, and the Child Support Directors Association prior to the meeting date. The updates shall include, but not be limited to, the following topics which can be spread across the four meetings: Order Establishment Process. A discussion on what factors local child support agencies (LCSAs) and courts use to determine the level of child support, including, but not limited to, providing information and data on zero orders, orders set under the guideline, orders established through stipulations versus default versus contested motions, orders established above or below the LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 7 guideline amount, and orders established using actual income or presumed or imputed income. Additionally, a discussion of how often child support orders deviate from the guideline, as referenced above, and the major reason or reasons for deviation. A contested motion refers to any support order that is not stipulated or a default. Order Modification Process. A discussion and data, to the extent that data is obtainable given current resources, on how many modifications are established through stipulations versus default versus contested motions. For each of these categories, a discussion and data on how long it takes to review, file a motion for, and, if applicable, hear a request to modify a child support order. Additionally, a discussion and data on how many modified orders are set at zero orders, orders set under the guideline, orders established above or below the guideline amount, and orders established using presumed or imputed income. Additionally, a discussion on the major reasons for deviation. Ability to Pay. A discussion of how ability to pay is defined in child support and whether the guideline accurately captures the ability to pay for all obligors. If the guideline does not accurately capture an obligor’s ability to pay, a discussion of why that is the case, how LCSAs and courts currently address this, and possible solutions. Financial Support for Children. A discussion of the level of financial support needed for children, whether child support orders and payments align with the level of financial support needed for children, and how the disregard and recoupment rules affect the ability of child support payments to fully meet the financial needs of children. Information in this area may include data on what percentage and how many custodial parents request an increase in an order due to the current order’s inability to meet children’s needs. Collections. A discussion and data, to the extent that data is obtainable given current resources, by LCSAs on whether collection rates for current support and arrears vary by different types of child support orders, including stipulated orders versus default orders versus orders set by a contested motion, orders set under the guideline versus orders established above or below the guideline amount, and orders established using presumed or imputed income versus orders established using actual income. Additionally, a discussion and data on how average monthly child support payments and collection rates vary by obligors whose payments go to families versus obligors whose payments go to the government as public assistance recoupment. Child Support Arrears. A discussion of what arrears reduction assistance is available to obligors with state-owed and\/or family-owed child support arrears, effectiveness of the state’s Compromise of Arrears Program, and the impact of the state’s interest rate on the accumulation of child support arrears and collection rates. Additionally, a discussion and data on how average arrears amounts vary by never assisted, currently assisted, and formerly assisted cases, and by arrears owed to the state versus arrears owed to the family. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 8 Local Administrative Funding Update. An update on program efficiencies and improvements the department is implementing and their impact on LCSA workload, collections, and families; how much LCSAs spend on indirect and overhead expenditures versus direct service expenditures; how LCSAs are spending additional funding provided under the 2019-20 Budget Act and 2020-21 Budget Act; and how DCSS plans to align all LCSA funding levels to reflect calculated funding needs. Updates on spending provided under the 2019-20 Budget Act and 2020-21 Budget Act would be contingent on the federal funding trigger provided in the 2020-21 Budget Act. If federal funding is not provided, an update on how LCSAs are adapting to decreased funding levels, including the numbers and types of staff layoffs, and steps that LCSAs are taking to improve their efficiency. An update on how the metrics, outcomes, and processes above are impacted by the funding decreases. Update on Implementation of Flexibility, Efficiency, and Modernization in Child Support Final Rule. An update on the implementation of the Flexibility, Efficiency, and Modernization in Child Support Final Rule, including, but not limited to, case closure criteria, use of actual income of the obligor when setting support obligations rather than imputed or presumed income based on earning capacity, and modifying child support orders for incarcerated obligors. Update on Recommendations From Quadrennial Review. A summary of the findings and recommendations from the most recent quadrennial review; role of Judicial Council, LCSAs, and DCSS in implementing the recommendations; status of the current quadrennial review process; and expected involvement of stakeholders, including, but not limited to, families served by LCSAs, the Legislature, and local human services agencies. Local Initiatives. A discussion of past (over the past five fiscal years prior to 2020-21) and current child support-related initiatives and pilot programs implemented by LCSAs or local courts\u2014including, but not limited to, custody and visitation orders, domestic violence screenings, and employment services referrals\u2014and impact on collections, families and the well-being of children. This should also include a discussion of the benefits, costs, and considerations of making any successful local initiatives apply statewide. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 9 CorreCTions and reHabiliTaTion Item 5225-001-0001\u2014California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation 1. Prison Infrastructure Improvement Strategy. On or before January 10, 2022, the department shall submit to the budget committees of each house and the Legislative Analyst’s Office a report containing an assessment of all special repair\/deferred maintenance projects estimated to cost over $5 million and all major capital outlay projects that are likely to be needed over the next ten years or more. The report may include, but not be limited to, such projects identified in the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s (CDCR) Master Plan, the Twelve Prison Study, and the state’s most recently published Five-Year Infrastructure Plan. (a) CDCR may exclude from the assessment those projects that were funded for construction in the 2020-21 fiscal year or prior. (b) All identified projects shall be ranked by priority and categorized into the following: (i) Immediate: Projects specifically required by court order and projects related to fire\/life\/safety that are needed to remedy conditions that pose an extraordinary immediate risk to inmates and staff. (ii) Critical: Any remaining court order-related projects and projects focused on gaining departmental efficiencies and reducing ongoing state costs. (iii) High: Projects focused on inmate rehabilitation and projects related to fire\/ life\/safety that are needed to remedy conditions that pose a substantial risk to inmates and staff. (iv) Low: Projects related to department-driven needs. (c) In identifying and prioritizing the projects, the department shall consider the following criteria. The report shall include an explanation of how the department weighed these criteria in determining the overall project ranking: (i) Criteria and prioritization methodology established by CDCR that incorporates its standard mission goals, strategic plan, and infrastructure plan goals. (ii) Current population and most recent population projections. (iii) The level of seismic risk, environmental hazards, and other critical health and safety hazards. (iv) The cost avoidance or savings that would be achieved due to the project through operational or organizational efficiencies created for the department and thus the state. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 10 (v) Consideration of alternatives to repairing existing facilities, including, but not limited to, redesigning, relocating, or consolidating facilities to achieve lower operational costs and\/or to better meet inmate needs as well as rebuilding facilities in locations that enhance the department’s operations (such as by improving recruiting). (vi) Consideration of how to prevent unnecessary costs by avoiding making modifications to a facility that is then subsequently rebuilt or renovated. (vii) Consideration of whether project costs could be reduced by completing all projects at the same prison at once. (viii) Ensure that projects at prisons that may be closed in the foreseeable future are only included in the list if they are needed to keep the prison operational until it is closed. (ix) Consideration of the actual useful life of existing infrastructure, not only whether it has exceeded its expected useful life when determining whether to repair or replace it. (d) The department shall note whether listed projects would be funded as part of its support budget (including special repair and deferred maintenance) or would be capital outlay projects. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 11 eduCaTion Item 6100-161-0001\u2014California Department of Education 1. Special Education Out-of-Home Care Program. The Legislative Analyst’s Office shall convene a working group to examine the Out-of-Home Care program and funding authorized by Section 56836.165 of the Education Code, and shall make recommendations for improvements to the program by March 1, 2021. The working group shall include representatives from the appropriate fiscal subcommittees and policy committees of the Legislature, the Department of Finance, the California Department of Education, the California Department of Social Services, and the California Department of Developmental Services. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2020-21 BUDGET ACT 12 governmenT operaTions Item 7760-001-0666\u2014Department of General Services 1. Department of General Services: California Statewide Pharmaceutical Program. No later than February 1, 2021, and annually thereafter until February 1, 2024, the Department of General Services shall submit to the budget committees of both houses and the Legislative Analyst’s Office reports on the California Statewide Pharmaceutical Program (SPP). Each report shall include the following information covering the prior calendar year: (1) the name of each of the pharmaceuticals procured through the SPP and the pharmaceutical’s main therapeutic effects; (2) the name of each jurisdiction or other entity, as relevant, that received pharmaceuticals through the SPP; (3) an estimate of the total dollar value of the pharmaceuticals procured through the SPP; and (4) an estimate of the amount of savings achieved through pharmaceutical purchases made through the SPP. ”

pdf 2019-2020 DSS Welfare State Budget Supplemental Report

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2019-2020 DSS State Budgtet Supplemental Report.pdf

” Preprinted logo will go here TO: AGENCY SECRETARIES DEPARTMENT HEADS BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS The Supplemental Report of the 2019-20 Budget Act contains statements of legislative intent that were adopted during deliberations on the 2019-20 budget package. Please distribute your responses to the supplemental report, and any other report or document you are required to submit, to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC), as follows: One Hard Copy of the Report and Transmittal Letter to: \uf0b7 Hon. Holly J. Mitchell, Chair Joint Legislative Budget Committee 1020 N Street, Room 553 Sacramento, CA 95814 Attention: Ms. Jennifer Troia. \uf0b7 Ms. Erika Contreras, Secretary of the Senate State Capitol, Room 3044 Sacramento, CA 95814. An Electronic Copy of the Report and Transmittal Letter to Each of the Following: \uf0b7 Joint Legislative Budget Committee: [email protected] for distribution to the JLBC Members. \uf0b7 Legislative Analyst’s Office: [email protected] 925 L Street, Suite 1000, Sacramento, CA 95814. \uf0b7 Office of the Chief Clerk of the Assembly: [email protected], and [email protected] Mr. E. Dotson Wilson, Chief Clerk of the Assembly Room 3196, State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814. \uf0b7 Legislative Counsel Bureau: [email protected] Office of Legislative Counsel Indexing Division 925 L Street, Suite 1105, Sacramento, CA 95814-3703 In the report, as well as in your transmittal letter to Senator Mitchell, please cite the 11-digit budget item number(s) and the budget year or other statutory reference to which the response relates. If you have any questions, you may contact the Legislative Analyst’s Office at (916) 445-4656. mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] mailto:[email protected] Containing Statements of Intent And Requests for Studies Adopted by the Legislature Supplemental Report of the 2019-20 Budget Act Compiled by the L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E August 2019 LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2019-20 BUDGET ACT 12 Item 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Expansion of CalFresh Eligibility to Supplemental Security Income\/State Supplementary Payment (SSI\/SSP) Recipients. The Department of Social Services (DSS), in collaboration with the County Welfare Directors Association of California, shall provide in-person updates to the Legislature on progress towards expanding CalFresh eligibility to SSI\/SSP recipients as a result of reversing the SSI cash-out policy. The updates shall include a discussion of qualitative information and, if collected and available, any quantitative data which may be provided on a quarterly basis and in the aggregate statewide. Additionally, specific components of the updates shall begin when enough data to conduct the analysis becomes available and the analysis of the data is complete, and cease when notification of completion of a specific activity occurs and\/ or when it is agreed by all parties that a component is no longer necessary for other reasons. If feasible, the update shall include any quantitative data that is collected by the state and\/or counties, including issuance data that may be available through the Electronic Benefit Transfer system. Any quantitative data may be provided on a quarterly basis and in the following ways: in the aggregate statewide and by county, demographic group, or other disaggregation, as readily available. The updates shall be monthly from July 2019 through January 2020. At the end of this period, the frequency of the updates moving forward shall be decided between the Administration and Legislature together. Commencing July 2019, the updates shall include but not be limited to: (a) Update on CalFresh Households with SSI\/SSP Members. An update on CalFresh households that include at least one member who is an SSI\/SSP recipient. To the extent possible, reporting under this paragraph shall also include an update on newly enrolled CalFresh households in which either at least one or all members are SSI\/SSP recipients and began to receive CalFresh benefits after the reversal of the SSI cash-out policy. The following data shall be included, as available and applicable, for new households that include both SSI and non-SSI recipients; continuing households that include both SSI and non- SSI recipients; and new households that include only SSI recipients: (1) number of approved and denied CalFresh applications from households, (2) primary reasons for denial, (3) method of application submission, (4) average number of days to determine eligibility for households that include at least one member who is an SSI\/SSP recipient from the date the application was submitted, (5) average amount of monthly food benefits for households that include at least one member who is an SSI\/SSP recipient, (6) the number of households that include at least one member who is an SSI\/SSP recipient approved for only the minimum benefit, (7) the number of households that include at least one member who is an SSI\/SSP recipient approved for the homeless shelter deduction, and (8) the number of households that include at least one member who is an SSI\/SSP recipient approved who claimed a medical deduction. (b) Update on Supplemental Nutrition Benefit (SNB) and Transitional Nutrition Benefit (TNB) Programs. An update on the implementation of the SNB and TNB programs, including, but not limited to: (1) number of SNB and TNB cases, LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2019-20 BUDGET ACT 13 (2) number of discontinued SNB and TNB cases, (3) primary reasons for discontinuances, and (4) whether the benefit amounts by household size appear to mitigate the impact of expanding CalFresh eligibility to SSI\/SSP recipients. (c) Update on Outreach and Stakeholder Partnerships. The update shall include, but not be limited to: (1) a summary of how funds for outreach were allocated and spent and (2) any information on the experiences and performance of partners, including application assisters. (d) Implementation Challenges. A discussion of any administrative or programmatic challenges faced by DSS, counties, or local organizations and partners associated with expanding CalFresh eligibility to SSI populations including, but not limited to, any challenges with (1) enrollment of newly eligible SSI\/SSP households, (2) modifications of CalFresh benefits for existing CalFresh households with at least one SSI\/SSP recipient, (3) implementation of the SNB and TNB programs, (4) language access, (5) Americans with Disabilities Act accommodations, (6) automation, and (7) customer service. Additionally, the discussion shall include information on solutions and contingency plans deployed or in the process of being deployed by DSS, counties, and\/or local organizations and partners to address implementation challenges. (e) Tracking County Costs. An update on county administrative costs associated with newly eligible SSI\/SSP recipients applying for and receiving CalFresh benefits and the new SNB and TNB programs. 2. Release of the RAND Year Three Evaluation of the Effects of SB 1041. On or before January 10, 2020, the administration shall make publicly available the final version of the RAND Corporation’s Year Three Evaluation of Chapter 47, Statutes of 2012 (SB 1041) and convene a briefing for legislative staff on the evaluation’s findings. This briefing shall include the principal researchers of the RAND Corporation who authored the three-part evaluation. In addition, the administration shall convene a meeting with the researchers in the summer of 2019 to preview high-level observations and findings with legislative staff. 3. Cost Estimate of Restoring the CalWORKs 60-Month Time Limit. On or before October 1, 2019, the California Health and Human Services Agency, the Department of Social Services, and the Department of Finance shall submit to the Legislature a cost estimate of restoring the California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) 60-month eligibility time limit. The submission shall include information on assumptions used to develop the cost estimate, including, but not limited to, cost per case, caseload, and economic conditions. As part of developing the cost estimate, the administration shall consult the Statewide Automated Welfare System consortia to determine any cost and time line considerations for necessary automation changes. 4. Assessment of the Effects of Restoring the CalWORKs 60-Month Time Limit. Subsequent to the sharing of the estimate developed pursuant to the above, the Legislative Analyst’s Office shall assess the administration’s cost estimate and report its findings to the Legislature on or before January 10, 2020. The administration is asked to LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2019-20 BUDGET ACT 14 share additional data and information with the Legislative Analyst’s Office, as needed, in order for it to conduct the assessment. The assessment shall also include an analysis of the potential policy implications or interactions related to restoring the 60 months, including, but not limited to, the following: (a) Considering the relationship between time limit extensions and the client and program goals of the CalWORKs Outcomes and Accountability Review (CalOAR). (b) Outlining what options might exist for phasing in restoration of the 60-month time limit over time. (c) Discussing illustrative examples of how the policy change for time limit extensions could potentially result in a reduction in deep childhood poverty for CalWORKs families. 5. State Hub Roadmap. Beginning March 1, 2020 and semiannually thereafter until January 10, 2029, the California Health and Human Services Agency, the Department of Health Care Services, and the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) shall jointly update the Legislature on how the planning, design, development, and implementation activities of active current health and human services (HHS) information technology (IT) projects are meeting the technical and nontechnical recommendations of Social Interest Solution’s The State Hub Roadmap: CDSS CalFresh and CalWORKs Streamlining Verifications (the State Hub Roadmap ), published in November 2018. The Office of Systems Integration will provide support as needed. The joint update shall include, at a minimum, the following projects: Statewide Automated Welfare System (SAWS) and the prospective California SAWS, as it is designed and developed. State Verification Hub. The joint update shall include other related HHS IT projects should their planning, design, development, and implementation activities align with the recommendations of the State Hub Roadmap. The joint update shall also indicate whether the state, in its HHS IT project activities, intends to deviate from the State Hub Roadmap recommendations, and if so, for what reason(s). The joint update shall also address how HHS IT project activities are addressing the key objectives identified in the report, including: For clients: Clarity about verification requirements and how to comply with them. Transparency regarding the status of their verifications and the basis for verification results. Reduced need for paper documentation, including repetitive requests for documents that have already been provided and remain valid. Multiple means of easily submitting verification documents when they are needed, including online submission, submission via mobile devices, and self- service scanning options in county offices and community locations. LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE 2019-20 BUDGET ACT 15 For program staff: Clarity about verification requirements and how to exercise their discretion in satisfying them quickly, accurately, and efficiently given the client’s circumstance. Access to only the electronic information that is relevant to a client’s eligibility. Sufficient transparency regarding verification results from electronic data matches to help resolve potential verification discrepancies. Efficient access to and processing of documents provided by clients. 6. Implementation of the CalWORKs Home Visiting Program. No later than December 31, 2019, the CDSS shall provide an update to the Legislature and stakeholders that shall include, but not be limited to, the following: (a) Strategies and technical support the department provided to counties during the application process. For those counties that did not opt into the program, any barriers identified that prevented a county or counties from participating in the program. (b) Demographics of participants and children in the program, including by race, ethnicity, national origin, primary and secondary language, and county, to the extent reasonably available. (c) Utilization and purpose of use of material goods funds through the Home Visiting Program, as available and reported on a county survey conducted by the department. ”

pdf 2018-2019 DSS Welfare State Supplemental Report

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” Supplemental Report of the 2018-19 Budget Act Containing Statements of Intent And Requests for Studies Adopted by the Legislature Compiled by the LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S OFFICE September 4, 2018 L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E 9 Item 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Child Abuse and Neglect Incidents Among Children Aged 14 to 17. The Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO), with assistance from the Department of Social Services (DSS), shall review data about the reporting of child abuse or neglect incidents among children who are aged 14 to 17. Where feasible, the LAO’s analysis shall consider for each age, and compared to data for other ages, the following questions: Rate of reporting. Outcomes of reporting. Sources of reports, if available, including self-reported abuse or neglect. Living conditions, including homelessness or living with a parent or guardian at the time of the report, if available. Number of petitions filed under WIC 329, and time frame of the filing, if available. Percentage of reports that involved children with prior reports. Generalized outcomes of prior reports. The Legislative Analyst’s Office may seek data from any sources it is authorized to access to fulfill the requirement of this SRL, including convening a working group, if appropriate. Depending on the availability of data, the LAO may analyze the data for the state as a whole or for a representative sample of counties. The LAO shall report results of this evaluation to appropriate budget and policy committees of the Legislature no later than March 15, 2019. 2. Case Management and Information Payrolling System (CMIPS) II Governance. DSS shall provide an update to the Legislature and stakeholders, as part of the 2019-20 budget process, on the engagement of counties in the implementation of CMIPS II for the In-Home Supportive Services program. The update shall include, but not be limited to, the following: (a) The steps the state has taken to engage the counties in the governance of the project throughout the change management process. (b) The criteria by which the state and county-driven change requests are approved or denied. (c) The process the state has engaged in managing the implementation and prioritization of state and county-driven change requests. Supplemental Report of the 2018-19 Budget Act (d) The roles and responsibilities of the state and counties in the change management process. 3. Medi-Cal Eligibility Data System (MEDS) Modernization. During the 2019-20 budget process, the Department of Health Care Services, DSS, and the California Health and Human Services Agency shall jointly update the Legislature on the status of identifying opportunities to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the file (index) clearance process for California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids, CalFresh, and Medi-Cal in MEDS utilizing Master Data Management (MDM) technologies. The initial scope of the MEDS Modernization project includes the development of an MDM strategy. The implementation of MDM in MEDS is intended to be part of the future scope of the project. The update described above, developed in consultation with counties, shall specifically identify the proposed strategy for implementation of MDM technologies, and include preliminary estimates of costs and the proposed time frame to implement. 4. In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Paid Sick Leave. No later than September 1, 2019, DSS shall provide an update to the Department of Finance and the health and human services budget subcommittees in both houses, that shall include, but not be limited to, the following: (a) The number of paid sick leave hours earned, and the number of paid sick leave hours taken by IHSS providers, by county. (b) For up to ten counties, reflecting the diversity of California’s counties (including, but not limited to, population, age, ethnicity, rural and urban), the number of instances broken down by county, in which the county receives a request from an IHSS recipient for a backup provider due to his or her regular provider using paid sick leave. (i) This shall be for the time period of September 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019. (ii) Counties shall be selected in consultation with the County Welfare Directors Association, California Association of Public Authorities, and stakeholders. (c) For the same counties as outlined in (b), the number of instances broken down by county, in which the Public Authority receives a request from an IHSS recipient for a back-up provider due to his or her regular provider using paid sick leave. 10 L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E 11 L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2018-19 Budget Act (i) This shall be for the time period of September 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019. (d) For each instance outlined in (b) and (c), each county and its Public Authority may coordinate to provide data to the department on the number of requests for a backup provider that were fulfilled and the number of requests for a backup provider that were unable to be fulfilled. 5. Fiscal Estimate for the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) Assessment. DSS shall work with the County Welfare Directors Association and the California State Association of Counties to estimate any net new one- time and ongoing workload and costs to county child welfare services agencies to implement the CANS assessment process beyond existing assessment requirements. By October 1, 2018, DSS shall report the results of this analysis to the Department of Finance and the legislative budget committees for the purpose of advising development of the January, 2019 budget proposal. 6. State Hub Roadmap. DSS is engaged in an effort to address existing challenges with the eligibility verification process for CalFresh and CalWORKs. Specifically, the programs’ current reliance on paper documentation to verify eligibility can create a burden on clients and delay application processing. In some instances where electronic verifications of eligibility are available, they can fail to provide the most current data, creating an application processing delay. In an effort known as the State Hub Roadmap, DSS is using the assistance of a contractor to identify electronic options to streamline and modernize the processes for obtaining required verifications for CalFresh and CalWORKs eligibility. The objective of the effort is to explore options to make the eligibility verification process faster, more accurate, and efficient for both clients and program staff. Any final deliverables from the contractor shall be shared directly and contemporaneously with the Legislature. DSS shall provide an in-person update to the Legislature and stakeholders, beginning September, 2018 and on an ongoing basis to be mutually determined between legislative staff and the Administration, on the status of the State Hub Roadmap. The update shall include, but not be limited to: (1) the progress of the contractor and DSS in the development of the State Hub Roadmap; (2) any of the contractor’s findings and recommendations, including but not limited to short-, medium-, and long-term recommendations on how to improve the verification process; and (3) the feedback provided by the Legislature and stakeholders, including county representatives and program advocates. Food for All. DSS shall convene relevant stakeholders, including, but not limited 12 L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E to, immigrant advocates and food security advocates, to identify how the State and local entities can improve current programs and coordinate linkages to community services to strengthen California’s food assistance safety net for all low-income Californians, and work to remove barriers that exclude immigrant Californians from the State’s food assistance safety net. Stakeholders shall be convened by September 30, 2018 and shall meet at least four times before July 1, 2019. ”

pdf 2017-2018 State Welfare Budget supplemental report for DSS

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2017-18-supplemental-report DSS.pdf

” Containing Statements of Intent And Requests for Studies Adopted by the Legislature Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act Compiled by the L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E July 2017 6 L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act HeaLtH and Human services 15L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act Item 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Reversal of the CalFresh Cash-Out Policy With a Hold Harmless Approach for Supplemental Security Income\/State Supplementary Payment (SSI\/SSP) Caseload. No later than January 1, 2018, the Legislative Analyst’s Office shall submit to the health and human services budget subcommittees and the human services policy committees of both houses of the Legislature and the Department of Finance a report reviewing the funding and program implications of reversing the CalFresh Cash-Out policy for recipients in the SSI\/SSP program, and potential options for holding harmless any recipients who might be subject to a reduction in CalFresh benefits. The report shall include discussion of the following as they relate to ending the cash-out policy and the options identified to hold recipients harmless from a reduction in CalFresh benefits: (a) practical implications for administrative processes and any potential administrative challenges; (b) estimated costs; and (c) possible impacts on recipients, including examples of how much more CalFresh benefits SSI\/SSP recipients could receive and how much closer to the federal poverty level this could bring those who live with benefits currently below that level. 2. Continuum of Care Reform (CCR). The Department of Social Services (DSS) and the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS), in collaboration with the California State Association of Counties, the County Welfare Directors Association, the County Behavioral Health Directors Association, and the Chief Probation Officers of California, shall provide monthly in-person updates to the Legislature on progress toward the implementation of CCR. Monthly updates shall convert to quarterly updates once all finalized guidance listed under paragraph (a) has been delivered to counties. Specific components of the updates shall cease when notification of completion of a specific activity occurs and\/or when it is agreed by all parties that a component is no longer necessary for other reasons. 16 L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act Commencing July 2016, the monthly updates, unless otherwise noted, shall include but not be limited to: (a) Update on Guidance to Counties and Stakeholders. Status updates on the delivery of interim and finalized guidance (including All County Letters, Information Notices, and Fiscal Letters) to counties and stakeholders on, as well as progress toward implementing, the following: (i) The Child and Family Teaming process, including, but not limited to, guidance on when children’s initial meeting must take place, the frequency with which meetings occur, and the composition of the teams (including the participation of mental health professionals on the team). (ii) How the assessment tool(s) will inform placement and Level of Care decisions made by the child and family team both during the pilot phase and after a standard assessment tool has been selected and implemented. (iii) How, and over what timeframe, the assessment tool will be evaluated (including details on how the pilot will be used to eventually select an assessment tool for statewide deployment). (iv) The definition of, differences between, and use of assessments related to each Level of Care. (v) Resource Family Approval process. (vi) County licensing and mental health program approval, including Medi-Cal Certification of Short-Term Residential Therapeutic Programs (STRTPs) and Medi-Cal Certification of Foster Family Agencies (FFAs). (vii) Access standards that apply to mental health services for children, including children in STRTPs, FFAs, Therapeutic Foster Care (TFC) homes, and Resource Families, and including what types of services are required to be offered by county mental health and managed care plans and the standards for timely access. (viii) Status updates on county allocations of state and federal funding for all other local assistance components of the CCR spending package. Data reporting under this paragraph may occur quarterly rather than monthly. 17L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act (b) Tracking County Savings and Costs. A status update on the development and communication with county departments of a methodology to track county costs and savings related to CCR implementation. (c) Systems Changes. A status update on the automation changes to the Child Welfare Services Case Management System and licensing systems needed to implement CCR (including the automation of foster care payments and the automated implementation of the selected standard assessment tool). This can include or be satisfied with a qualitative, high-level description of the progress made (for example, major milestones or percentage of progress toward completion). (d) Update on Child Welfare Provider Performance Outcomes Dashboard. Status updates on the creation of a provider performance outcomes dashboard, including: (i) Until public, the anticipated release date of the public dashboard. (ii) Individual measures, including any measures related to STRTPs and FFAs, expected to be added to the dashboard and their anticipated date of publication. (e) Update on County Recruitment and Retention Efforts. Status updates on the recruitment and retention of new resource families. Data reporting under this paragraph may occur quarterly rather than monthly, to the extent relevant data is available, and shall include the following: (i) County allocations of the recruitment and retention funding in the 2015-16 and 2016-17 fiscal years. (ii) The most utilized county activities funded with 2015-16 and 2016-17 recruitment and retention funding. (iii) Outcome measures to assist the Legislature in evaluating the effectiveness of various recruitment and retention activities at the county level. This includes the number of resource families recruited and retained with the funding, and each county’s net change in such placements. 18 L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act Commencing January 2017, to the extent the relevant data is available and in addition to the elements above, the quarterly updates shall include but not be limited to: (f) Update on the Transition of Providers to the CCR Service Model. With a focus on changes over time, status updates on the transition of providers to the CCR service model. Data reporting under this paragraph may occur quarterly rather than monthly and shall include the following: (i) Number of applications for STRTP and FFA licensure. (ii) Status of accreditations of STRTPs and FFAs. (iii) Number of licenses granted to STRTPs and FFAs. (iv) Number of license extension requests from group homes received by probation and child welfare agencies. (v) Number of license extensions granted to group homes by probation and child welfare agencies. (vi) Primary reasons why group home license extensions are necessary. (vii) Rate of FFAs and group homes not pursuing a new license under CCR standards and the current licensed capacity of those providers. (viii) Number and identification of counties with licensed temporary shelter care facilities. (g) Update on Capacity to Provide Mental Health Services. With a focus on changes over time, status updates on the capacity of all involved providers to provide mental health services. Data reporting under this paragraph may occur quarterly rather than monthly and shall include the following: (i) Number of STRTPs requesting mental health program approval and outcomes of approval requests. (ii) Number of STRTPs with mental health plan contracts to provide mental health services and identification of the counties with which the STRTPs have contracts. 19L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act (iii) Number of FFAs with mental health plan contracts to provide mental health services and identification of the counties with which FFAs have contracts. (iv) Number of FFAs electing to provide placements in TFC homes. (h) Tracking Child Outcomes Over Time. With a focus on changes over time, and to the extent data is available, status updates on the following child outcome measures: (i) Number of children in out-of-home care stratified by placement type, Level of Care, and whether the supervising department is county child welfare or probation. (ii) Number of placements per child. (iii) Proportion of placements that constitute a move to a less restrictive setting. (iv) Average length of stay per placement episode by placement type. (v) Number of children receiving the FFA and services-only rate, stratified by county. (vi) Number of children receiving specialty mental health services on a quarterly or monthly basis stratified by service type, county, placement type, and Level of Care. In addition and as data becomes available, services shall be further delineated by its subcomponents including assessment, plan development, collateral contacts, rehabilitation, and therapy. (vii) Number of children receiving mental health services on a monthly basis under the Medi-Cal managed care and fee-for-service systems stratified by service type, county, placement type, and Level of Care. In addition and as data becomes available, services shall be further delineated by its subcomponents, including assessment plan development, collateral contacts, rehabilitation, and therapy. (viii) Mental health provider (including STRTPs, FFAs, and managed care plans) and county performance on timely access standards for mental 20 L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act health for the foster care population, including date of initial child welfare\/probation placement and receipt of service. (ix) Number and disposition of service complaints regarding specialty and non-specialty mental health service delivery for foster youth. (x) To the extent that the information requested here is not available to be shared in the 2017-18 fiscal year, the departments shall describe the limitations and explore and present options for remedying this lack of available information. As part of this, DSS and DHCS shall hold a separate meeting to include stakeholders, county representatives, and legislative staff to discuss this area of monitoring and evaluation. (i) Update on CCR-Related Costs and Savings. Once available, status updates on CCR-related costs and savings, including: (i) Ongoing county costs and savings related to CCR implementation. (ii) Other services and supplemental payments for which counties use reinvested CCR-related savings (including funding for FFA services-only rate). (j) Update on the Assessment Tool Pilot. Status updates on the assessment tool pilot shall include but not be limited to: (i) Information on the assessment tool pilot evaluation and the ultimate selection of a standardized assessment tool. (ii) Ongoing information on how DSS is ensuring consistent statewide outcomes of the new Level of Care assessment for children across counties. (k) Update on CCR Rates. Status updates on how DSS is evaluating the adequacy of the new CCR rate structure, including: (i) The extent to which the new STRTP and FFA rates are adequate to compensate providers for meeting the new service requirements of CCR. (ii) The extent to which each of the Level of Care rate levels provides adequate resources to resource families caring for children at all assessed levels of need. 21L E G I S L A T I V E A N A L Y S T ‘ S O F F I C E Supplemental Report of the 2017-18 Budget Act (iii) County changes to Specialized Care Increments (SCI) programs, including any changes in benefit levels and suspensions or terminations of SCI programs. Item 5180-101-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Community Care Licensing: Use of the Key Indicator Tool. On or before July 21, 2017, the Department of Social Services (DSS) shall provide a briefing to the Legislature and key stakeholders on the status of the use of the Key Indicator Tool (KIT) for Community Care Licensing (CCL) inspections. This update shall include, but not be limited to, (a) a discussion and summary of the KIT research reports completed to date, (b) information on the circumstances in which a KIT is used rather than a comprehensive assessment by facility type, (c) an explanation of what criteria prompts a KIT inspection to turn into a comprehensive inspection, (d) an explanation of how the department will evaluate the effectiveness of the KIT compared to the comprehensive or other assessments, and (e) an explanation of the work the department is doing to standardize the comprehensive assessment or develop any additional alternatives. Additionally, no later than September 30, 2017, DSS shall provide a document justifying its long-term plan for the use of the KIT versus the comprehensive or other assessment. If this long-term plan includes the continuance of the use of the KIT, the document should also specify how the use of the KIT will be factored into future budget-related requests for CCL. This document shall also include an update on any progress that has been made on the standardization of the comprehensive assessment. Item 5180-141-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. County CalFresh Denial and Discontinuance Reports. The department shall update the Legislature at budget hearings on the development of statistical reports relative to the CalFresh program. The department shall convene a workgroup composed of advocates of CalFresh beneficiaries, county workers or their representatives, the State Automated Welfare Systems (SAWS) and the County Welfare Directors Association to develop CalFresh and CalFresh Expedited Services application denials and benefit discontinuances report elements, to be reported by county and by consortia. These reporting elements identified by the workgroup shall be ones necessary to inform policy decisions which support maximum participation of eligible Californians and prevent duplication of effort for caseworkers, applicants and recipients. The workgroup shall take into consideration and provide input on the potential workload and automation impacts of its recommendations. ”

Document 2016-2017 DSS Welfare State Budget Supplemental Report

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“TO: AGENCY SECRETARIES DEPARTMENT HEADS BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS The Supplemental Report of the 2016-17 Budget Package contains statements of legislative intent that were adopted during deliberations on the 2016-17 budget package. Item 5180\u2011001\u20110001\u2014Department of Social Services ………………………………………………….. 20 Item 5180\u2011001\u20110001\u2014Department of Social Services [bookmark: _GoBack] 1. Case Management Information and Payrolling System (CMIPS II). The Department of Social Services and the Office of Systems Integration, in collaboration with stakeholders, including the CMIPS II system vendor and labor organizations representing In\u2011Home Supportive Services (IHSS) providers, shall provide a cost assessment to the Legislature by January 10, 2017 that includes the cost of options for reprograming CMIPS II to allow managed care plans participating in the Coordinated Care Initiative to pay IHSS providers for additional hours that the managed care plan authorizes pursuant to Welfare and Institutions Code 14186 (b) (6)(B). The assessment shall include a variety of options and their respective costs, and identification of the least costly option for implementing the system change noted above. 2. Options for the Provision of Diaper Assistance to Low-Income Families. The Department of Social Services, with the Office of Systems Integration and the Department of Public Health, in collaboration with stakeholders, including the County Welfare Directors Association of California and legislative staff, shall consider and inform the Legislature of options to provide diaper purchase assistance to low\u2011income families. Approaches for consideration shall include, but not be limited to, the following: (a) options for delivering the benefit by way of a paper voucher system or other distribution approach for the larger California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) population, (b) ways to provide this as a supportive service to the CalWORKs welfare\u2011to\u2011work caseload, potentially using a voucher or ancillary expense benefit approach, and (c) the feasibility of providing this as an automated benefit long\u2011term, to include a range of potential options based upon functionality for the commodity\u2011based delivery of a CalWORKs benefit. The involved state agencies shall provide the Legislature with a summary of the various approaches and automation options, and, to the extent available, their initial estimated costs by February 1, 2017. 3. Continuum of Care Reform (CCR). The Department of Social Services (DSS) and the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS), in collaboration with the California State Association of Counties, the County Welfare Directors Association, the County Behavioral Health Directors Association, and the Chief Probation Officers of California, shall provide monthly in\u2011person updates to the Legislature on progress toward the implementation of CCR. Monthly updates shall convert to quarterly updates once all finalized guidance listed under paragraph (a) has been delivered to counties. Specific components of the updates shall cease when notification of completion of a specific activity occurs and\/or when it is agreed by all parties that a component is no longer necessary for other reasons. Commencing July 2016, the monthly updates, unless otherwise noted, shall include but not be limited to: (a) Update on Guidance to Counties and Stakeholders. Status updates on the delivery of interim and finalized guidance (including All County Letters, Information Notices, and Fiscal Letters) to counties and stakeholders on, as well as progress toward implementing, the following: (i) The Child and Family Teaming process, including, but not limited to, guidance on when children’s initial meeting must take place, the frequency with which meetings occur, and the composition of the teams (including the participation of mental health professionals on the team). (ii) How the assessment tool(s) will inform placement and Level of Care decisions made by the child and family team both during the pilot phase and after a standard assessment tool has been selected and implemented. (iii) How, and over what timeframe, the assessment tool will be evaluated (including details on how the pilot will be used to eventually select an assessment tool for statewide deployment). (iv) The definition of, differences between, and use of assessments related to each Level of Care. (v) Resource Family Approval process. (vi) County licensing and mental health program approval, including Medi\u2011Cal Certification of Short\u2011Term Residential Therapeutic Programs (STRTPs) and Medi\u2011Cal Certification of Foster Family Agencies (FFAs). (vii) Access standards that apply to mental health services for children, including children in STRTPs, FFAs, Therapeutic Foster Care (TFC) homes, and Resource Families, and including what types of services are required to be offered by county mental health and managed care plans and the standards for timely access. (viii) Status updates on county allocations of state and federal funding for all other local assistance components of the CCR spending package. Data reporting under this paragraph may occur quarterly rather than monthly. (b) Tracking County Savings and Costs. A status update on the development and communication with county departments of a methodology to track county costs and savings related to CCR implementation. (c) Systems Changes. A status update on the automation changes to the Child Welfare Services Case Management System and licensing systems needed to implement CCR (including the automation of foster care payments and the automated implementation of the selected standard assessment tool). This can include or be satisfied with a qualitative, high\u2011level description of the progress made (for example, major milestones or percentage of progress toward completion). (d) Update on Child Welfare Provider Performance Outcomes Dashboard. Status updates on the creation of a provider performance outcomes dashboard, including: (i) Until public, the anticipated release date of the public dashboard. (ii) Individual measures, including any measures related to STRTPs and FFAs, expected to be added to the dashboard and their anticipated date of publication. (e) Update on County Recruitment and Retention Efforts. Status updates on the recruitment and retention of new resource families. Data reporting under this paragraph may occur quarterly rather than monthly, to the extent relevant data is available, and shall include the following: (i) County allocations of the recruitment and retention funding in the 2015\u201116 and 2016\u201117 fiscal years. (ii) The most utilized county activities funded with 2015\u201116 and 2016\u201117 recruitment and retention funding. (iii) Outcome measures to assist the Legislature in evaluating the effectiveness of various recruitment and retention activities at the county level. This includes the number of resource families recruited and retained with the funding, and each county’s net change in such placements. Commencing January 2017, to the extent the relevant data is available and in addition to the elements above, the quarterly updates shall include but not be limited to: (a) Update on the Transition of Providers to the CCR Service Model. With a focus on changes over time, status updates on the transition of providers to the CCR service model. Data reporting under this paragraph may occur quarterly rather than monthly and shall include the following: (i) Number of applications for STRTP and FFA licensure. (ii) Status of accreditations of STRTPs and FFAs. (iii) Number of licenses granted to STRTPs and FFAs. (iv) Number of license extension requests from group homes received by probation and child welfare agencies. (v) Number of license extensions granted to group homes by probation and child welfare agencies. (vi) Primary reasons why group home license extensions are necessary. (vii) Rate of FFAs and group homes not pursuing a new license under CCR standards and the current licensed capacity of those providers. (viii) Number and identification of counties with licensed temporary shelter care facilities. (b) Update on Capacity to Provide Mental Health Services. With a focus on changes over time, status updates on the capacity of all involved providers to provide mental health services. Data reporting under this paragraph may occur quarterly rather than monthly and shall include the following: (i) Number of STRTPs with mental health plan contracts to provide mental health services and identification of the counties with which the STRTPs have contracts. (ii) Number of FFAs with mental health plan contracts to provide mental health services and identification of the counties with which FFAs have contracts. (iii) Number of FFAs electing to provide placements in TFC homes. (c) Tracking Child Outcomes Over Time. With a focus on changes over time, and to the extent data is available, status updates on the following child outcome measures: (i) Number of children in out\u2011of\u2011home care stratified by placement type, Level of Care, and whether the supervising department is county child welfare or probation. (ii) Number of placements per child. (iii) Proportion of placements that constitute a move to a less restrictive setting. (iv) Average length of stay per placement episode by placement type. (v) Number of children receiving the FFA and services\u2011only rate, stratified by county. (vi) Number of children receiving specialty mental health services stratified by service type, county, placement type, and Level of Care. (vii) Number of children receiving mental health services under the Medi\u2011 Cal managed care and fee\u2011for\u2011service systems stratified by service type, county, placement type, and Level of Care. (viii) Mental health provider (including STRTPs, FFAs, and managed care plans) and county performance on timely access standards for mental health for the foster care population. (ix) Number and disposition of service complaints regarding specialty and non\u2011specialty mental health service delivery for foster youth. (d) Update on CCR-Related Costs and Savings. Once available, status updates on CCR\u2011related costs and savings, including: (i) Ongoing county costs and savings related to CCR implementation. (ii) Other services and supplemental payments for which counties use reinvested CCR\u2011related savings (including funding for FFA services\u2011only rate). (e) Update on the Assessment Tool Pilot. Status updates on the assessment tool pilot shall include but not be limited to: (i) Information on the assessment tool pilot evaluation and the ultimate selection of a standardized assessment tool. (ii) Ongoing information on how DSS is ensuring consistent statewide outcomes of the new Level of Care assessment for children across counties. (f) Update on CCR Rates. Status updates on how DSS is evaluating the adequacy of the new CCR rate structure, including: (i) The extent to which the new STRTP and FFA rates are adequate to compensate providers for meeting the new service requirements of CCR. (ii) The extent to which each of the Level of Care rate levels provides adequate resources to resource families caring for children at all assessed levels of need. (iii) County changes to Specialized Care Increments (SCI) programs, including any changes in benefit levels and suspensions or terminations of SCI programs. ‘The Supplemental Report of the 2016-17 Buulget Package contains statements of legislative intent that were adopted ‘during deliberations on the 2016-17 budget package. ’em $180-001-0001\u2014Department of Soci Services 1. Ge anagem rman ad Pyeng Sem (CIPS The pen oct Seen and tne Or ems ingen icra i ‘Sita ncaing he CMS open er an br agente ‘epcsetng ln ame Suporte Svs (ES) prover hal pve at ‘Sci othe atte yon 1037 hats of pons ‘Erepaming Caw managed ne lan arcane ‘Suni Canney SS pis br dione the trang re onc loess 56) (Git The een sal nears varetyo pane anh apc ct Inline otha ie pntng bee caee 2 pos rie vio pte Fn Te Srp cc et co Span he Spun Rae at i ab nye oy lnm Neate aad nt al SRO MIGSS WT seen pem porate Scio tas efor pte hr arg eh Seperate eons durin pensar ee Seer ehcp vs oe ngs ees rcs pete pro a he SOS eee acral toring ea ste Sipe tested wp acy te mot easy S2Cihoalstenar Tele ae op pepe Schramm eves ppenier dao puentt sivonne hatin pata rat 2 Cinta rm 1 Tern a evi 8) scp Canon Scan ”

Document 1995- 2016-2017 DSS Welfare State Budget Supplemental Report

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Welfare_Budget__Supplemental_Reports_from_1995_on.docx

“CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES[image: CCWRO Logo] BUDGET SUPPLEMENTAL REPORTS LANGUAGE Compiled and Published by Coalition of California Welfare Rights Organizations, Inc. CCWRO 1111 Howe Avenue, Suite 150, Sacramento, CA 95825-8551 Phone: (916) 736-0616 Fax: (916) 736-2645 The Supplemental Report of the 2015 Budget Act Item 5180001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. CalWORKs Oversight. The state Department of Social Services (DSS), in collaboration with stakeholders, including counties, advocates, and legislative staff, shall convene an oversight workgroup to assess the emerging effects on California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids recipients, their families, and program administration, of recent policy changes including, but not limited to, those enacted by Chapter 47, Statutes of 2012 (SB 1041, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review), and Chapter 21, Statutes of 2013 (AB 74, Committee on Budget). The workgroup shall examine the effects of those changes in the context of the experiences of program administrators, advocates, and recipients, as well as available data on caseload and welfare-to-work participation trends, such as the rate of adults removed from the aided unit pursuant to Section 11327.5 and subdivision (f) of Section 11322.85 of the Welfare and Institutions Code. The department may reconvene a previously existing workgroup to fulfill this requirement. The workgroup shall commence meeting no later than September 2015, and shall convene no less than once every four months thereafter through 2017-18. At legislative hearings on the 2016-17 and 2017-18 budgets, DSS shall discuss the workgroup’s activities and observations. 2. Item 5180101-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Drought Expenditures. No later than January 10, 2016, the Department of Finance shall provide to the fiscal committees of both houses a report that provides the amount of encumbrances and expenditures for each drought-related appropriation included in Chapter 2, Statutes of 2014 (SB 103, Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee); Chapter 3, Statutes of 2014 (SB 104, Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee); the 201415 Budget Act; Chapter 1, Statutes of 2015 (AB 91, Assembly Committee on Budget); and the 201516 Budget Act. These amounts shall be inclusive of expenditures and encumbrances through December 31, 2015. The Supplemental Report of the 2014 Budget Act Item 5180001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. CalWORKs Oversight. The Department of Social Services (DSS) shall collaborate with legislative staff, the Legislative Analyst’s Office, and key stakeholders on the creation of an annual report on the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, covering caseload dynamics, demographics of families and children living in poverty and deep poverty in the program, impacts and implementation of recent policy changes, and other components to be decided in the course of those discussions. The report will also address the use and outcomes of research funds appropriated to DSS. Progress toward an annual report shall be provided in the form of a verbal update by January 15, 2015, with the first iteration of the report to be presented by April 1, 2015, at which date there shall be consideration regarding the annual date ongoing. 2. Child Welfare Services-New System Project (CWS-NS). Commencing August 2014 the Department of Social Services and the Office of Systems Integration will provide monthly updates to the Legislature and to stakeholders, including the California Welfare Directors Association, regarding efforts to develop and implement the CWS-NS Project. The updates shall include, but not be limited to: (a) the vacancy rate, the duration of each vacant position and its classification, and the status of efforts to fill the position; (b) challenges with recruiting and retaining qualified staff and a description of efforts to resolve the issues; (c) challenges with procurement, including any delays, and a description of efforts to resolve the issues; (d) any issues or risks, including but not limited to pending state and federal approvals, that may jeopardize the project’s completion or result in delays relative to the approved project schedule, budget; and scope and (e) progress on and projected completion dates for any significant upcoming project milestones. This reporting requirement shall be reviewed and modified as necessary upon the completion of the procurement phase of the CWS-NS Project and the signing of the contract with the selected primary vendor. The Supplemental Report of the 2013 Budget Act Nothing for Social Services The Supplemental Report of the 2012 Budget Act Nothing for Social Services The Supplemental Report of the 2011 Budget Act Nothing for Social Services The Supplemental Report of the 2010 Budget Act Item 5180-141-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) System Ongoing Maintenance. The Office of Systems Integration and the Department of Social Services shall provide an update to the Legislature and to stakeholders, including the California Welfare Directors Association, California State Association of Counties, Western Center on Law and Poverty, and California Food Policy Advocates, on (a) efforts with the vendor to limit disruption in EBT access, (b) communications with counties about any problems and resolutions as they arise, and (c) how consumers are being informed of issues and recourse when disruptions do occur. The Supplemental Report of the 2009 Budget Act Item 5180\u2011111\u20110001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants (CAPI) Advocacy Program. The Department of Social Services (DSS) shall provide a report to the Legislature by July 1, 2010, that documents, by county, (a) the total CAPI caseload, (b) the number of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) applications filed by CAPI recipients through the advocacy programs, (c) the number of the SSI applications filed through the advocacy programs that were approved, and (d) the amount of the savings resulting from the CAPI Advocacy Programs. 2. In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Quality Assurance Reporting. The DSS shall provide an update to the Legislature quarterly on IHSS utilization data by county, task, and client level. The data will also provide information on the number of exceptions by county, task, and client level. The Supplemental Report of the 2008 Budget Act Item 5180\u2011001\u20110001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS). The Department of Social Services (DSS) in coordination with the State Controllers’ Office (SCO) shall report to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC) no later than September 30, 2007, identifying the tasks to be completed and their anticipated completion dates which result in implementation of direct deposit for IHSS providers by June 30, 2008. The DSS and the SCO shall provide an interim project status report to the JLBC no later than April 30, 2008. The DSS and the SCO shall meet with the Legislative Analyst Office, the Department of Finance, and interested stakeholders quarterly to discuss the project status. 2. Erosion of In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Quality Assurance Savings. The Department of Social Services shall report to the Legislature quarterly on IHSS utilization data by county, task, and client level. The data will also report the number of exceptions by county, task, and client level. The Supplemental Report of the 2007 Budget Act Item 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services Report on Community Care Licensing Automation and Enforcement Data Capacity. The Department of Social Services (DSS) shall provide a written plan to the Legislature by April 1, 2007, that includes the costs and benefits of developing the capacity to track the following enforcement data: (1) the number of civil penalties issued for non-correction of violations and for repeated serious violations, (2) total number of civil penalties assessed, (3) the number of noncompliance conferences held and, (4) the number of resulting probationary and revocation actions taken against facility licenses. 2. In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Quality Assurance. The DSS shall provide to the Legislature quarterly updates on the IHSS utilization data by county, task, and client level. The updates will include information on the number of exceptions by county, task, and client level. The Supplemental Report of the 2006 Budget Act Item 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Report on Community Care Licensing Automation and Enforcement Data Capacity. The Department of Social Services (DSS) shall provide a written plan to the Legislature by April 1, 2007, that includes the costs and benefits of developing the capacity to track the following enforcement data: (1) the number of civil penalties issued for noncorrection of violations and for repeated serious violations, (2) total number of civil penalties assessed, (3) the number of noncompliance conferences held and, (4) the number of resulting probationary and revocation actions taken against facility licenses. 2. In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Quality Assurance. The DSS shall provide to the Legislature quarterly updates on the IHSS utilization data by county, task, and client level. The updates will include information on the number of exceptions by county, task, and client level. The Supplemental Report of the 2005 Budget Act 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services Community Care Licensing Data Reporting. It is the intent of the Legislature that the Department of Social Services (DSS) adequately monitors the Health and Safety of adults and children in community care facilities. Because accurate and complete data measuring these efforts is essential, DSS shall provide to the Legis-lature by January 31, 2006, a quarter of complete data that includes the following information for each program area. \u00b7 Actual numbers of all types of contacts including: \u2014 Complaints. \u00b7 Regular visits (required annual and random). \u00b7 Follow-up visits. \u00b7 Number of total deaths occurring in facilities (will not be comparable to past data due to change in reporting requirement). \u00b7 Number of citations and degree of seriousness of citation (defined by Type A or Type B). \u00b7 Amount of civil penalties assessed and collected by program type. \u00b7 Number and seriousness (defined by Type A or Type B) of citations gen- erated by each type of contact. \u00b7 Follow up visits (serve as proxy information for incident reports) resulting in citations and seriousness of citation. The Supplemental Report of the 2004 Budget Act \u2029Nothing for Social Services The Supplemental Report of the 2003 Budget Act Nothing for Social Services \u2029The Supplemental Report of the 2002 Budget Act \u2029 Item 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. Administrative Hearings Toll-Free Number. It is the intent of the Legislature that the department shall provide to the Legislature, by March 1, 2003, a report detailing the status of implementing an automated phone system to address calls to the department\u02bcs toll-free number. The report will update the data from the 2002 report. 2. Residential Treatment for Parental Drug Abuse. The department, with the participation of the Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, shall report by March 1, 2003, to budget and policy committees of the Legislature, on whether state or federal foster care funding could be adapted to serve the board and care needs of children who are in residence with their parent(s) in a drug treatment program, and who are placed there with the participation of a dependency court that finds that out-of-home placement is the alternative to parental drug treatment. The report should include a survey of funding sources, including information about the impact on out-of-home care costs for children, if available, as well as any statutory or regulatory changes that would need to take place for such reimbursement to occur. 3. Adoptions. The department shall make available through the budget process county-by-county information on the number of final adoption placements and the number of guardianships from 1997-98 to the most recent information available. The information shall include whether the adoption case backlog addressed in the 2000-01 budget has recurred. 4. Residual Services. The department shall make available at budget hearings in 2003, information about the state\u02bcs efforts to identify groups of services under the In-Home Supportive Services residual program that could be adapted to assure Medicaid reimbursement, including advance payment cases, services intended to provide protective supervision, and any other services where federal reimbursement is possible. The Supplemental Report of the 2001 Budget Act \u2029 Item 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) Statewide Evaluation. The department shall release to the Legislature each report of the statewide evaluation of the CalWORKs program no later than 210 days after each report is submitted to the department. 1. Special Circumstances Program. The Department shall gather information from counties and report to the Legislature by March 1, 2002, on the extent to which counties transferred funds from administration to benefit provisions in the special circumstances program, as a result of statutory changes enacted associated with the 2001-02 budget. 2. Adoptions Initiative. The Department shall make available through the budget process, county-by-county information on the number of final adoption placements, and the number of guardianships, from 1997-98 through 2000-01. The information shall include whether the adoption case backlog addressed in the 2000-01 budget year has recurred. 3. Statewide Automated Welfare System Strategic Plan. The California Health and Human Services Agency and the Department of Social Services shall, by May 1, 2002, provide a strategic plan to the chairs of the budget committees in each house and the Chair of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee which reflects the statutory requirements and policy objectives of Chapter 270, Statutes of 1997 (AB 1542, Aroner) into the Statewide Automated Welfare System (SAWS). The strategic plan shall identify: (1) measurable program objectives and benefits that the state will achieve through automation and (2) the SAWS milestones at which the state will reassess the automation approach for the state\u02bcs welfare system. 4. Interim Statewide Automated Welfare System Maintenance and Operation Plan. The Health and Human Services Agency Data Center and the Department of Social Services, in consultation with the Department of Information Technology (DOIT) and the Department of Finance, shall, by January 1, 2002, provide a report to the chairs of the budget committees in each house and the Chair of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee which describes the five-year maintenance and operation plan for the Interim Statewide Automated Welfare System. The plan shall be prepared in accordance with DOIT\u02bcs policy for maintenance and operation planning. 5. Administrative Hearings Toll-Free Number. It is the intent of the Legislature that the department shall provide to the Legislature, by March 1, 2002, a report detailing the status of implementing an automated phone system to address calls to the department’s toll free number. The report will provide data on the number of calls answered, the number of call backs, and the number of busy phone calls. 6.Foster Care Reports. It is the intent of the Legislature that the department shall provide a report detailing the finding of the SB 160 Phase II rate study steering committee to the Legislature by September 2001. 7. In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Sliding Scale. It is the intent of the Legislature that the department shall, by January 1, 2003, submit a report to the Legislature on the feasibility of adopting a pilot project for a sliding-scale system of universal eligibility for in-home supportive services in counties that have adopted public authorities for the provision of those services, with services to be provided either through the IHSS Program or as personal care option services under the Medi-Cal Program. The Supplemental Report of the 2000 Budget Act \u2029 Item 5180-101-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. CalWORKs Sanctions. The department shall report to the Legislature, no later than April 1, 2001, on the rates of good cause establishment from sanctions and curing of sanctions in the CalWORKs program. The report shall also include recommendations for improving these current processes. 2. CalWORKs Inter-County Transfers. The department shall report to the Legislature, no later than April 1, 2001, on findings and recommendations to improve the current CalWORKs inter-county transfer process to minimize disruption to services for current CalWORKs recipients. Item 5180-151-0001\u2014Department of Social Services Child Care Facility Safety. The department shall collect data on unmet needs for child care facility safety and shall submit a report to the Legislature by June 30, 2001. The department shall submit a budget change proposal for 2001-02, if appropriate, based on results of their review. The Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act Item 5180-001-0001\u2014Department of Social Services 1. In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) Program Growth. The department shall establish a work group, with counties and other stakeholders, to examine the growth rate in the IHSS Program, particularly as it relates to the increasing senior population, and its impact on county cost. Not later than February 15, 2000, the work group shall make recommendations to the Legislature for possible funding changes that would ensure continued client access to these supportive services without placing an undue financial burden on counties. 2. Substance Abuse\/HIV Adoptions Program. The department shall submit a report to the Legislature by March 1, 2000, on the implementation of the Substance Abuse\/HIV Adoptions program (specialized training for adoptive parents). The department shall submit a subsequent report by December 30, 2000 on the program\u02bcs outcomes, and an assessment of its effectiveness and the degree to which it has accomplished its goals. The Supplemental Report of the 1998 Budget Act Nothing for Social Services The Supplemental Report of the 1997 Budget Act Nothing for Social Services The Supplemental Report of the 1996 Budget Act Item 5180-001-0001–Department of Social Services 1. [bookmark: _GoBack]Group Home Audits. The department shall report to the fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature by January 15, 1997 on the feasibility and cost- benefit of contracting out the foster care group home audit function. The report shall include consideration of contracting with the private sector and state control agencies that routinely perform fiscal and program audit functions, such as the Bureau of State Audits or the State Controller’s Office. The report shall also include a comparison of the cost of contracting out versus retaining the audit function within the department. The department shall consult with staff of the Legislative Analyst’s Office and the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature on its approach to comply with this requirement and shall keep the Legislature apprised of its progress. 2. Adoptions Initiative. The department shall identify and implement strategies to maximize adoption opportunities for children in long-term foster care. The strategies shall include: \u00b7 Establishing specific goals for the adoptions program, including but not limited to, timeliness and stability of placements and increased number of placements; \u00b7 Developing proposals to make improvements in the areas of kinship adoptions, open adoptions, adoptions of older and minority children, and concurrent planning for children in out-of-home care; \u00b7 Streamlining the adoption process, including the identification and evaluation of any barriers caused by regulations, statutes, procedures, and practices at the federal, state, and local levels; \u00b7 Establishing uniform and compatible performance agreements with county agencies and state adoptions district offices, including specific performance measures and proposed incentives and sanctions. The department shall consult with the counties, the Legislative Analyst’s Office, staff of the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature, and other interested parties throughout the process of developing these adoption strategies. By November 1, 1996, the department shall submit a progress report and summary of the specific program goals to the fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature. By March 1, 1997, the department shall provide to these same committees a copy of the draft proposals specified in (b) above, and evaluation of identified barriers requested in (c) above, and draft performance agreements described in (d) above. The Supplemental Report of the 1995 Budget Act Item 5180-001-001-Department of Social Services Foster Care Rate Setting System. The department shall convene a working group to review and recommend to the Legislature a new or revised rate setting system for licensed foster family homes and foster family agencies, and report its recommendations to the Legislature by March 1, 1996. The working group shall include representatives from the department, counties, providers, consumers, and the Legislature. The Supplemental Report of the 1992 Budget Act Item 5180-001-001 – Department of Social Services 1. Regionalization of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) Grants. The Department of Social Services shall report to the Legislature no later than January 1,1993 on a plan to regionalize AFDC payments. The plan must consider at least four regions based on fair market rents and other cost-of-living measures and present timelines for implementation. The Supplemental Report of the 1991 Budget Act Item 5180-001-001 – Department of Social Services 1. Child Support Guidelines. It is the intent of the Legislature that the Judicial Council and the Department of Social Services (DSS) work together to obtain federal reimbursement for the costs of the child support guidelines study required by Ch. 1493\/90 (AB 3974, Assembly Committee on the Judiciary). The Judicial Council shall report to the fiscal committees of the Legislature on the Joint Legislative Budget Committee by December 15, 1991 on its efforts to obtain federal reimbursement to offset the costs of the child support guideline 2. Los Angeles Corrective Actions. The County of Los Angeles shall have developed and implemented by July 1, 1991 all corrective actions for each of the 26 problem areas that the department identified in its notice of noncompliance that was submitted to the county on August 1, 1990 and which were contained in the Corrective Action Plan given conditional approval by the department. Based on (a) the information submitted in the county’s corrective action plan and (b) the results of the department’s data collection and compliance monitoring, the department shall determine by September 1, 1991 whether the county has made substantial progress in correcting the areas of noncompliance. 3. Los Angeles Child Welfare Services Allocation. It is the intent of the Legislature that subsequent appropriations be made in the 1991-92 fiscal year to the DSS for allocation to Los Angeles County for its Child Welfare Services Program to the extent that previously lost cases are verified pursuant to a case review by the DSS. 4. Greater Avenues for Independence (GAIN) Study. The department shall report by April 1, 1992 to the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature on the steps taken by the department and the GAIN Program to ensure maximum use by training agencies of the $2,700,000 included in Item 5100-001-514 for the sole purpose\u00b7 of funding special employment training projects that are limited to training participants in the GAIN Program or recipients of state-only AFDC-U. The Supplemental Report of the 1990 Budget Act Item 5180-001-001 – Department of Social Services 1. Child Support Enforcement Program. The Department of Social Services (DSS) shall, by March I, 1991, implement an administrative review process for the child support enforcement program, in which the department will conduct program reviews of low-performing programs, commencing with the program ranking the lowest. Under this process, the department will review those counties that (a) rank in the bottom quartile in performance, as measured equally by Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recoupment rates and a measure of non-AFDC collections (such as non-AFDC collections per non-AFDC child) and (b) are below the statewide median in terms of their improvement in performance over the prior year. To facilitate this review, the department will determine the administrative effort of each county and the expenditure increase, if any, that would be necessary to bring this effort up to the statewide average. The measure of administrative effort will consist of total administrative expenditures as a percentage of total AFDC Family Group grant expenditures in the county, or a similar measure showing each county’s comparative effort in AFDC and non-AFDC program expenditures. In each program review, the department will develop a corrective action plan designed to improve county performance. The plan will include findings on the causes of the county’s low performance, and specific recommendations to address these problems. The plan will also include a three-year expenditure plan, which will indicate the county’s projected administrative effort and its relationship to the statewide average. If the expenditure plan would not bring the county’s administrative effort at least to the statewide average, the reasons for this variance will be set forth. The department will submit a copy of the corrective action plan, and annual progress reports, to the county district attorney and board of supervisors, the Department of Finance, the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC), and the fiscal committees of the Legislature. If the county does not comply with the corrective action plan, the department shall, within six months, submit a report to the Legislature and the Department of Finance on the feasibility of the state assuming responsibility for the program in that county. The report shall include consideration of all the alternatives to the Department of Social Services as the administering agency, including the Franchise Tax Board, the Department of Justice, or other alternatives. The department shall adopt guidelines for the administrative review process and submit these guidelines to the Department of Finance and the JLBC by December 15, 1990. The Supplemental Report of the 1988 Budget Act Item 5180-001-001–Department of Social Services 1. Homeless Assistance Administration. The Department of Social Services (DSS) shall instruct counties to separately track and identify their costs to administer homeless assistance payments pursuant to Ch 1253\/87. The DSS shall report to the Legislature by March I, 1989 on costs reported by the counties and on recommendations to reduce these costs, if any. 2. Homeless Assistance Program. The DSS shall submit a report to the Legislature by May I, 1990 on the costs and effectiveness of the Homeless Assistance program. Specifically, the report shall include at least the following information: Characteristics data on recipients of both the emergency shelter and housing deposit grants. The number of grants awarded in each county and the costs of the emergency shelter and housing deposit grants. The causes of homelessness reported by aid recipients. To the extent possible, the number of residence changes and length of time in the residence after receipt of the Homeless Assistance grants. This will include information on some recipients for at least a one-year period. This will, to the extent possible, include information on Homeless Assistance recipients who subsequently leave the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. Plans for ongoing data collection activities. The number of denied requests for homeless assistance and to the extent possible the reasons for the denials. The estimated cost of housing payments for homeless assistance recipients in each county in 1988-89. Recommendations to (a) improve the program’s effectiveness in assisting persons to locate and retain permanent housing, (b) improve the program’s cost-effectiveness, and (c) establish more cost-effective alternatives to assist the homeless. 3. In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS)–Mode of Service Delivery. The DSS shall submit a report to the Legislature by July I, 1989 on the quality and costs of the supervised independent provider mode of providing IHSS. The report shall include, but shall not be limited to, the following information: The costs of the welfare staff mode in the counties that use that mode of service delivery The quality of the services provided, including the length of time between service authorization and service delivery, and other measures of service quality. A comparison of the costs of this mode to the costs of the independent provider and contract modes of service delivery. 4.California Necessities Index (CNI) Update. The Commission on State Finance shall report to the fiscal committees by November 1, 1988 on at least two methodologies for updating the CNI. The report shall include the effect of each methodology on the CN!’s inflation rate in recent years and the reasons why each methodology produces a different result. The report shall recommend one of the methodologies to the Legislature based on the following criteria: The extent to which the methodology reflects consumption patterns of low-income consumers in California. The availability of data for regularly updating the CNI using the methodology. The statistical reliability of the methodology. 10. Greater Avenues for Independence. It is the Legislature’s intent to move toward a uniform, statewide method of allocating funds to the counties for operation of the Greater Avenues for Independence (GAIN) program. In order to provide the Legislature with the information that it will need to assess options for developing such an allocation methodology, the department shall include the following information together with the budget documentation for the 1989-90 budget proposal that it submits pursuant to Section 10614 of the Welfare and Institutions Code: a. The estimated costs to fund anticipated caseloads in all counties in 1989-90, assuming no statutory caseload restrictions. b. The estimated costs to fund all counties at full implementation, assuming no statutory caseload restrictions. c. The extent to which the amount proposed in the 1989-90 Governor’s Budget is sufficient to fund estimated costs. d. The department’s plans for allocating the funds proposed in the Governor’s Budget among the counties. In addition, the DSS shall report to the fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature, the Joint Oversight Committee on GAIN, and the Joint Legislative Budget Committee by March 15, 1989 on its plans and timetable for implementing a uniform statewide allocation methodology. The Supplemental Report of the 1987 Budget Act 12.Automation Report. The DSS shall report to the fiscal committees and the Joint Legislative Budget Committee by June 3D, 1988 on the costs and benefits of the automated intake and benefit computation pilot project conducted in San Diego. This report also shall discuss the implications of the results in San Diego on the proposed design of the Statewide Automated Welfare System (SAWS) project. The department shall use the data from San Diego to project the cost-effectiveness of SAWS to the state. 13.Overhead 13.Overhead Costs. The DSS shall report by February I, 1988 to the fiscal committees of the Legislature and the Joint Legislative Budget Committee on its plan to revise the way county welfare department overhead costs are allocated beginning in 1988-89. This report shall fully describe the department’s proposal and shall include the following information: (a) the total cost or savings to the state due to shifts in the amount of overhead attributed to the operation of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Food Stamp, Greater Avenues for Independence (GAIN), Medi-Cal, and other social services programs administered by county welfare departments; (b) the costs or savings that each county would experience due to cost shifts; and (c) the department’s plan to temporarily or permanently reduce the impact of these shifts on individual counties. 14.Income and Eligibility Verification System (IEVS) Follow-Up Thresholds. The DSS shall test a variety of follow-up thresholds under the IEVS program in order to determine the amount of follow-up that is needed to ensure that the progra,m maximizes savings at the lowest possible costs. The department shall report by December I, 1987 to the Legislature concerning the extent to which local follow-up activity can be automated. This report shall include an assessment of the costs and savings of automating the various components of county IEVS workload. 15.GAIN Child Care. The DSS in conjunction with the State Department of Education (SDE) shall collect data beginning July I, 1987 on the extent to which GAIN participants are using SDE \”subsidized\” child care once they graduate. from the program. Such data shall include the number of children of GAIN graduates who are receiving services, the number of children of GAIN graduates who on waiting lists for services, and the length of time these children have remained on the waiting lists. 16.GAIN-Community-Based Organizations (CBOs). When a county elects to use community-based organizations to provide remedial education to GAIN participants, the county shall include in its GAIN plan criteria for the use of CBOs. The county shall also collect data for both CBOs and public adult education programs, using the individual GAIN participants as the unit of analysis, and shall include measures of all of the following: (a) Background characteristics of participants that might be expected to influence the individual’s likelihood of success. (b)Cost of education services provided. (c) Duration and type of services provided. (d)Method of service delivery (including the use of alternative settings and techniques, and the use of volunteers). (e) Effectiveness of reaching program goals (such as changes in academic skill levels and successful job placement). The Supplemental Report of the 1986 Budget Act Item 5180-001-001–Department of Social Services 1. SSI\/SSP Continuing Disability Reviews. The Department of Social Services (DSS) shall submit a report by April 1, 1987, that reconciles its estimate of savings due to the resumption of CDRs with its actual experience in implementing the new CDR regulations. 2. Quality Assurance. The DSS shall (a) review the findings of the State Controller’s audit report of the SSI\/SSP and (b) submit a report 90 days after the State Controller’s report is released that provides the state’s proposal for the contract with the federal government regarding the federal quality assurance system. 3. IHSS Provider Information. The DSS shall collect and provide the following information to the Legislature: (1) The number of providers currently employed in the individual provider service delivery mode, including: (a) The number of individual providers who reside at the same address as an IHSS recipient. (2) The average hourly cost of provider wages and benefits for each service delivery mode, including: (a) The wage per hour for individual providers in each county and the hourly cost of the benefits that the state offers individual providers. (b) County claim information and the wages and cost of benefits for county welfare department providers in three selected counties. (c) The wages and the cost of benefits per hour for all providers who are employed by contractors, including the wage per hour for supervisors of \” contract providers. (d) The number of contractors that employ providers who are available to work evenings and weekends. (3) The per-hour cost to the state of each provider mode, including: (a) A summary of the factors that account for the difference between the cost of wages and benefits and the total cost to the state of each provider mode. (4) The screening and referral practices of a significant sample of counties. The following information should be included: (a) How counties screen and refer providers. (b) Who performs the screening and referral. -66- (c) The number of provider registries that the county (i) operates and (ii) uses for referrals. (d) The number of these provider registries that screen the providers prior to including them in the registry. (5) Develop a plan for a statistically valid survey to evaluate the extent of, and the reasons for recipient problems with locating and retaining competent providers, according to measurable criteria to be performed in 1987-88. The 1987-88 survey will be based upon information developed in the course of 1986-87 by the department in consultation with the Legislature, the counties, and advocate groups. This information will include a summary list of potential recipient problems with locating and retaining competent providers.\” 4. Consultation with Advocates. The department shall consult, on a continuing basis, with client advocates knowledgeable in IHSS, such as Independent Living Centers, Multipurpose Senior Services Programs, when testing and establishing assessment forms, when training in the use of such forms, and when designing surveys and interpreting results. These same advocates shall be consulted on other major IHSS issues the department discusses with county welfare departments. 5. Local Food Service Agencies. The department, by September 1, 1986, shall encourage county welfare departments to consult with local food pantries, food banks, legal services organizations, welfare rights organizations, and other community-based organizations, as to how food stamp participation can reduce unnecessary referrals to volunteer emergency food programs. 6. Welfare Fraud Meetings. The Early Welfare Fraud Committee shall hold quarterly meetings around the state. Announcements of these meetings shall be jointly developed by the department and the Coalition of California Welfare Rights Organizations. Such announcements shall at least advise persons who have been referred to this program they may appear before the committee. 7. Components of GAIN Estimates. The GAIN estimate of total expenditures includes the following components: Child Care Child Care Licensing Transportation Ancillary Expenses Workman’s Compensation Administration Planning and Implementation Education and Training 1986-87 Total -67- $15.6 .5 2.7 . 8 .3 22.3 10.6 34.3 $87.1 8. Food Stamp Error Rates. The DSS shall report to the Legislature by December 15, 1986, on the costs and statistical strengths and weaknesses associated with developing county-specific estimates of error rates in the food stamp program through the following methodology: developing a dollar-error methodology similar to the method used to estimate AFDC error rates including and excluding (a) under-issuances which have no dollar impact on the food stamp program, (b) technical errors which do not affect eligibility or benefit levels, and (c) client errors over which the counties have insufficient controls. Prior to submission, the department shall consult with the counties and the report shall contain the comments of the County Welfare Director’s Association. 9. Child Welfare Services (CWS). The department shall report to the Legislature by April 1, 1987, on the feasibility of using the technology, equipment, and systems of the IHSS Case Management Information and Payrolling System (CMIPS) in order to contract for the development and implementation of an on-line CWS case management system. 10. Adult Protective Services (APS). In conjunction with the reports required by Ch 1163\/85 and Ch 1164\/85, respectively, the department shall: (a) Keep a count of the APS caseloads in each pilot county. (b) Develop a consistent definition of a case from the information gathered in the pilot counties. (c) Include a statewide characteristic survey of abuse victims and abusers for at least one month prior to the report due date. This survey shall include, but not be limited to, the action taken by the counties for reports of abuse or neglect. 11. Child Support Enforcement. The department shall identify issues in the administration of the Child Support Program which have not been comprehensively studied and which are likely to produce program improvement if successfully resolved. In conducting its analysis, the department will consult with district attorneys’ offices to obtain input on areas that should be included in the study. The DSS shall report the result of its analysis to the Legislature by January 1, 1987. 12. Need for Long-Term Care Services. The DSS shall review data included in the California Department of Aging’s long-term care plan, and if appropriate, incorporate the data when the DSS developes its IHSS budget and allocates IHSS funds. The Supplemental Report of the 1985 Budget Act Item 5180-001-001–Department of Social Services 1. WIN Demonstration Project Transfer. The Department of Social Services (DSS) shall submit a report by January 1, 1986, to the Legislature which addresses specified fiscal and implementation issues due to transferring the registration and referral responsibilities of the WIN Demonstration project from the Employment Development Department to the county welfare departments. This report shall include at a minimum: (a) an estimate of the appropriate level of funding for EDD and the county welfare departments based on the results of the pilot projects and the reports of the nonpilot counties, (b) the number of individuals who were required to participate and the number of individuals who received services, and (3) a discussion of implementation issues. 2. Win Demonstration Data Collection. It is legislative intent that the department shall collect sufficient data with which to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of expanding the job search workshops under the WIN Demonstration Project. Types of data to be collected shall include, but not be limited to: (a) number of participants in job search workshops; (b) number of job placements for those who do and do not receive job search services; (c) for those participants who are placed in jobs: (i) the average starting wage, (ii) types of jobs secured, (iii) duration of employment (to the extent data are available), (iv) effect on the AFDC grant; (d) the average cost per participant and per employed participant; (e) number of and reason for terminations by FG and U; (f) number of and reason for sanctions by FG and U. 3. S8 14 Report. The Department of Social Services shall report to the Legislature by October 1, 1986, on the extent to which (a) counties with relatively high emergency response social worker caseloads tend to provide emergency response services only to the most serious cases, (b) counties with relatively high emergency response social worker caseloads tend to respond to reports of abuse less promptly than other counties, (c) counties with relatively high family maintenance social worker caseloads tend to prematurely or inappropriately terminate cases as a way of reducing their caseloads, (d) the ethnicity of a child affects his or her chances of being reunited, and (e) the currently required frequency of social worker client contacts in the Family Reunification and Permanent Placement programs is necessary to ensure a high degree of success in achieving the goals of S8 14. The department shall also provide its recommendations for actions to correct any problems identified in its report. 4. IHSS–Assessments and Service Awards. The DSS shall prepare an evaluation of its efforts to increase statewide uniformity in the IHSS assessment process and to standardize the award of service hours. The department shall report its findings to the Legislature by March 1, 1986. The department’s evaluation shall include the following: (a) a statement of measurable objectives. The objectives may include (1) a specified variance between counties in the percentage of clients that receive a specific service, (2) a specified variance in the total -96- hours awarded for clients with similar levels of disability, and (3) any other appropriate objectives; (b) an analysis of specifically how each of the following will contribute to the achievement of objectives developed pursuant to paragraph (1): (1) statewide time-per-task standards, (2) compliance and management reviews of counties, (3) Santa Cruz Pilot Project, (4) revised IHSS regulations, (5) IHSS Management Information System, (6) Equity Assessment Model, as used in Alameda County, (7) revised allocation formula implemented in 1984-85, (8) any other means the department may develop in order to achieve the objectives developed pursuant to paragraph (1); (c) an implementation plan that shows the expected time-frame for achieving the objectives developed pursuant to paragraph (1). 5. IHSS–Revised Allocation. The DSS shall evaluate the effect of the 1984-85 and 1985-86 allocations on each county’s IHSS program and report its findings to the Legislature by January 1, 1986. The evaluation shall include for each fiscal year (a) the effect of the allocation on county costs per case, (b) the effect of the allocation on county caseloads, (c) the effect of the allocation on the reduction in services, if any. The department shall also include in the report a discussion of any changes or proposed changes in the allocation formula presented in the August 1984 Allocation Taskforce Report. 6. Adoptions Report. The department shall submit a report to the Legislature, by December 1, 1985, that (a) establishes goals for state and county adoptions agencies’ performance during 1985-86 in terms of the number of adoptions per social worker FTE and (b) provides the department’s recommendations regarding how the Relinquishment program’s performance can be improved. 7. County Welfare Department Performance. The department shall implement a system to collect data on the following performance measures: (a) time from a request for assistance to the intake interview; (b) time from a signed application to approval for aid; (c) time from a signed application to the disbursement of aid; (d) share of AFDC applicants who receive immediate assistance, including the share of AFDC applicants who request immediate assistance and the amount of time from request for immediate assistance to immediate assistance authorization; (e) share of Food Stamps (FS) recipients given expedited service, including the share of FS applicants who request expedited service and the amount of time from request for expedited service to expedited service authorization. The department shall submit a progress report of its implementation effort to the Legislature by December 1, 1985. The department shall consider including any costs associated with this effort that cannot be absorbed within the 1985-86 budget in the 1986-87 budget request. 5 ”